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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! I finally finished leveling my small paver patio that our grill sits on. Our yard slopes and it was a real bear getting it to this point.

Two of the edges (the left side and edge away from the house) are somewhat elevated above the grass/soil line and I'm not sure how to finish them off. 1. So it helps secure the patio and 2. So it doesn't look like an eye sore (And also won't cost me a ton). The landscaping edge was just to help me line things up temporarily.

I'd appreciate any ideas. I don't need perfection, but I'd like to do a respectable job.

You can find all the photos in my album Grill Patio. (I have yet to fill the "grout" areas with the final sand yet, so if you notice that, I'm aware :)

Thanks so much for the help!!! This type of stuff isn't my area of expertise so pictures or specific instructions are always appreciated.
 

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In my opinion, you need to either lower the pad or raise the soil elevation on the downhill side. I would probably lower the elevation of the pad, trim the soil down a bit on the top side to make the transition a bit smoother, and call it a day. But you need to make that decision, take the blocks back up, use spike in place edging, lay the blocks, and bring the soil to the top edge of the blocks. Otherwise you have what you have now, nothing to hold the blocks in place and a real pain to mow around. And I understand that you want it fairly level so that the grill doesn't wander off on its' own, but I would put at least some pitch on it, which would help smooth out the transitions.
 

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Dig a trench along the "high edges". Mix up some S-Type mortar, put a couple inches in the trench. Put a few more of the same pavers, set on edge, in your mortar trench, against the existing "patio" edges. Backfill trench.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
In my opinion, you need to either lower the pad or raise the soil elevation on the downhill side. I would probably lower the elevation of the pad, trim the soil down a bit on the top side to make the transition a bit smoother, and call it a day. But you need to make that decision, take the blocks back up, use spike in place edging, lay the blocks, and bring the soil to the top edge of the blocks. Otherwise you have what you have now, nothing to hold the blocks in place and a real pain to mow around. And I understand that you want it fairly level so that the grill doesn't wander off on its' own, but I would put at least some pitch on it, which would help smooth out the transitions.
Thanks, but lowering the pad isn't an option and there is a pretty significant slope on three sides of the pad so increasing the soil line around it would require tearing up a large portion of my lawn and a ton of soil. Looking for something straight forward like a way to border it.
 

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I am not expert in these matters, but your little pad is pretty small, and one idea that pops into my mind is to use plastic lumber. I am talking about a length of stuff such as "Trex" decking material. The stuff cuts like wood and will not rot. There are different types and thicknesses -- you want the stuff that is more-substantial -- kind of like a 2 x 6. You could go all the way around your little paver pad with this decking -- the decking being set "on edge" (recessed into the soil, level with the pavers) and screwed together at each corner. This will help contain the pavers and hold them together, and give you a little bit of a secure edge on the downward side of the pad.
 

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I'd go grab a 1/2 dozen bags of top soil and bring it up to grade so to speak. I think you will be happy with that. Pretty simple fix really. Maybe you might need a dozen but your talking very few dollars. Just rake it in. When the grass grows in it will look like it belongs


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