DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
so I built a pergola over my small backyard deck about 5 years ago and it's held up great. We put lattuce on the roof for some shade, but it still got a lot of sun and it didn't help from the rain (obviously). This year we took off the lattice and lay pressure treated fenceboards on the roof with very little space in between. It's great for the shade, but again water runs down the roof to the spaces between boards and pours onto the deck. Just wondering if there are any ideas out there for making it a little more water resistant. We don't want to change the look of the board from underneath. We were thinking that with swell, caulking would do nothing so maybe some clear PVC panels to go over the top of the deck boards? Will probably cost $100 for 4 panels, just wondering if that would work or if any other better ideas.

Thanks,
Arch
 

·
Naildriver
Joined
·
12,350 Posts
We don't know the measurements of your pergola, so we are a little blind on that. It may be possible to place a cleat on the front edge and install metal roofing which would shed water to the back. Knowing the measurements will bring better advice.
 

·
Naildriver
Joined
·
12,350 Posts
Even without a slope, you could leave the wooden slats and apply a steel roofing panel system on top. I doubt it would puddle enough to make it drip. Having a slope to it is ideal, so if you can figure how to do that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ha ha, it actually is sloped away from the house. I guess I forgot to put that in the original post. Ya we love the way it looks underneath with the boards, so i'll have to look in to where I can find some metal roofing panels and the cost. Thanks for the idea!

Arch
 

·
Usually Confused
Joined
·
7,352 Posts
A pergola that provides shade from the sun and rain is a roof. Steel panels would likely go up fairly easily. You might get a drip line on the ground under the lower edge. If you are in an area that experiences snow load, consider the effect on the 'pergola' mountings. The structure itself looks pretty beefy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Lenaitch, yep I said in my original post that it started as a pergola 5 years ago, but as I named the thread it is now a "patio roof". Looks like metal is the way to go. Definitely built it with the thought that if we changed it into a covered roof in the future it would have to carry a snow load of some sort. So ya, "beefed" it up. Thanks for the input. Any ideas where to get the least expensive metal roofing material...guess I can just google it.

Arch
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,784 Posts
Although corrugated roof is simple and cheap, it becomes a loud drum during the hard rain. With a slope, modified roll roofing, just nailed along the edge without regard for proper flashing may work just as well. Now it has a roof, time to think about the wind load on that roof. How is the attachment to the house, free standing? and I think you need better corner bracing and how the corners, footings, lattices and fence boards were fastened. Also do you have snow? Your beam may not be good enough.
Also, the box store fence boards are thin. You can't walk on those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,991 Posts
I would be concerned about putting metal on that pressure treated "deck". I'd stick with the $100 PVC unless I could be sure the fence boards won't corrode a metal roof.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,595 Posts
My son is doing just what you want with old recycled fence boards. Changing 2 cabanas that was there when he bought the property.

He has a buddy that's a fence contractor and they trade services so the lumber is basically free minus his commitment to the friend.

He is an early riser and doesn't mind hard work so shingles are made on site from recycled fence lumber. But he did purchase a good stapler so maybe at age 50 he is slowing down just a bit.

As can be seen he needs to get back at it as the sun still shines through from two roof slopes. But he is real busy with his work load so I cut him a little slack.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,991 Posts
I would think if you put down tar paper first that would take care of any corrosion concerns between the metal and the PT lumber.
Good point I hadn't thought of. But I'd still just stick with the PVC given the nature of the structure.....No baby grand piano sitting underneath.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
I'm not sure if you're concerned with the look of the roofing but Peel and Seal Roofing Membrane would make it waterproof. It's not really removalable if applied directly. If you think you want to remove it one day, you would nail down tar paper with discs, then apply the roofing. It comes in different colors. About $130 per roll for 3' X 30'.

http://www.mfmbp.com/purchase/store/tabid/81/ProdID/21/CatID/1/Peel_and_Seal.aspx
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,556 Posts
Although corrugated roof is simple and cheap, it becomes a loud drum during the hard rain. With a slope, modified roll roofing, just nailed along the edge without regard for proper flashing
I think the modified roll roofing it a better choice.

Standard corrugated metal roof is recommended for 3/12 slope or better.

There are steel roofing panels that are high seam, low slope rated. But you need to talk to a roofing supply to get them. Not a big box item.
 

·
retired painter
Joined
·
11,087 Posts
I'm not overly familiar with the corrugated but I added onto the back of my barn 10 yrs [?] ago and roofed it with the 5v crimp roofing. It has less than a 2/12 pitch and has never leaked. I suppose if you were paranoid you could put a bead of silicone under each joint.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top