DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi there,

hope you are well.

I'm having trouble with a nailer ("lite line" paslode fs18-200) I recently bought. I'm using it for trim work and it's leaving a much bigger mark on the work than I would have expected (and than I would like!). please see picture attached (it's blurry shot of a door jamb; the scale on ruler is inches on the right side, centimeters on the left). Any ideas what is happening to cause this? I've turned the pressure on my compressor down (no success), and my next step is to switch from 2 inch nails to something shorter (e.g., 1 to 1.5 inch).

thanks

Matt
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,508 Posts
The contact arm has a depth adjustment. Turn the air down to 85-90#.
 

·
KemoSabe
Joined
·
644 Posts
My guess is that the piston/driver is worn or broken. Here's a link to an exploded view. Scroll down to the parts list/exploded view. Part #14. If the tip of the driver is missing, the blade won't set the nail and the wider part of the blade will strike the wood, leaving a larger indentation.

http://www.toolpartsdirect.com/cgi-bin/schematic.cgi/paslode/T125_F-18/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
771 Posts
That particular gun is a combination brad nailer and stapler.

This means that the driver blade is much wider than a normal brad nailer allowing the gun to also drive staples. Consequently it is going to leave a wider countersink that resembles a finish stapler. If you want to leave a smaller mark you are going to need a dedicated brad or finish nailer.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
3,634 Posts
If you have any countersink, of course your work is not finished until you fill with spackling and sand. And this is how it should be done, rather than just painting over supposedly 'flush' nails. Because they are never exactly flush... either too far in or not in far enough.

That being said you are better off having a larger and deeper hole than one just barely indenting the surface. The deeper hole gives a far better base to embed the spacking into. Oftentimes just a light indention invites the spackling to flake off later on.

Also, turn your gun 90 degrees. Crossing the grain like you are doing damages a lot more wood than if the driver parralled the grain of the wood.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top