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I bought Fibafuse on a good deal from the Home Depot website. I checked the HD Canada site and it doesn't look like they carry it :/
 

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FibaTape and FibaFuse are completely different products.
What's the difference between FibaTape and FibaFuse?

They're made by the same company. Is the difference in the weave pattern? ---> FibaTape having a large weave pattern and FibaFuse having a very small weave pattern?
 

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What's the difference between FibaTape and FibaFuse?

They're made by the same company. Is the difference in the weave pattern? ---> FibaTape having a large weave pattern and FibaFuse having a very small weave pattern?
Disregard. Answered my own question. For anyone who is curious, FibaTape uses either a square grid pattern of weaving, or a stronger version of FibaTape has the square grid pattern AND a diagonal/diamond shaped weave too, in order to give it greater strength. FibaFusion is a true cloth-like fiberglass tape that has no repeatable weave pattern.

Would REALLY like to know how standard paper tape compares to FibaFusion in overall joint strength.
 

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Good to know! Thanks.

I will say that in my research, I've come across a drywall guy named Myron Ferguson, who is often thought of as the guru of all things relating to drywall. In a book he wrote on drywalling several years ago he says he "often" used self-adhesive mesh tape on tapered seams but always used standard paper tape on butted seams.

However....I found a YouTube video last night where he says he is now comfortable with FibaFusion to use it on butt joints. His endorsement was good enough for me. Here's the clip:


In my opinion, I bet in the coming years standard paper tape will be used less and less as companies develop their own kind of 'FibaFuse'. Technology marches on, and that's fine with me. I want the best stuff you can get. :thumbsup:
 

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What I read of Myron, I thought he said he used setting compound with mesh tape - at least that's what I remember from his book. I do also remember him touting FibaFuse. I think it's just great stuff. If people would get over their issues with using corner trowels, then it would obsolete paper because there wouldn't be the issue of it tearing when taping a corner.
 

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Ordonyez:

I don't care if you use paper, fiberglas mesh or fiba fuse. If you're looking for a good way to do butt joints with any and all of these tapes, then read my posts about using a curved trowel in the thread entitled:

"Question about Inside and Outside corners in Drywall repair work"

about 15 posts below yours in this Drywall & Plaster forum.
 

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Ordonyez:

I don't care if you use paper, fiberglas mesh or fiba fuse. If you're looking for a good way to do butt joints with any and all of these tapes, then read my posts about using a curved trowel in the thread entitled:

"Question about Inside and Outside corners in Drywall repair work"

about 15 posts below yours in this Drywall & Plaster forum.
Yep, gotta admit, Myron talks constantly about using a 14" curved hand trowel. Up until I started learning about Myron I didn't know/never heard of a drywaller using a mason-type trowel. I thought everyone used just straight taping knives. Obviously not so. I'm debating about a curved trowel myself.
 

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A curved trowel isn't a masonary tool. It's a drywaller's tool. You buy them in the places that sell drywall and plastering supplies. You won't find them in the places that sell brick and masonry supplies.

Who is "Myron"?
 

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A curved trowel isn't a masonary tool. It's a drywaller's tool. You buy them in the places that sell drywall and plastering supplies. You won't find them in the places that sell brick and masonry supplies.

Who is "Myron"?
Bought a stainless steel, 14" curved trowel yesterday on Amazon. Big box store in my town didn't have any. Anxious to try it out. I've got a lot to learn....
 

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Bought a stainless steel, 14" curved trowel yesterday on Amazon. Big box store in my town didn't have any. Anxious to try it out. I've got a lot to learn....
You'll find that curved trowels eat a LOT of joint compound, but they make butt joints a breeze.
 
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Don't press too hard with it or you'll defeat the purpose :)
Hey, that's good info to know. Thx!

What I don't yet understand is the trowel is only 14" wide and most guys seem to recommend a butt joint mound of mud wider than 14". For example, Myron Ferguson says he goes about 20".

So how do you spread anything wider than the trowel's 14" without having to raise one of the edges (top or bottom) of the trowel off of the wall? If you leave both of the trowel's edges ON the surface of the wall as you pull it you're limited to only a 14" wide spread. And if you raise one end like I said, how does the edge still in contact with the wall not dig into the wall and gouge it?

Like I said, I've got a lot to learn....
 

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For joints wider than your knife, you have to do it in 2 passes. For a 20" pass, you're going to do the top 11" or so in the first pass, overlapping the centerline by an inch or so. On the second pass, you do the bottom 11", once again overlapping the centerline by about an inch on the top.
 

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Let us know how the curved trowel works for you. I never got mine to work I know some people like them. I got mine when I decided to change from knives to trowels. I really tried to get it to work but never quite managed it. Seems like a hump was what I was trying to avoid, not make one. I changed to flat trowels and stayed with them so am just curious how it works for you.
 

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Couple quick notes about humps and curves: on butt joints, you can't avoid a hump, you're just trying to manage one. The only way to avoid a hump is to use back blocking, which of course isn't possible in the standard situation of a butt joint on a stud. So for some people, it can be easier to mud the joint with a cruved trowel than a flat one. But even for tapered seams or back blocked seams, keep in mind that joint compound tends to shrink somewhat, so leaving a little extra to shrink down can result in a flat joint. Also, using a flat and somewhat flexible knife can leave a concave joint even on a tapered seam because the pressure causes the knife to bend inward slightly. If you press on a curved trowel a little, it becomes flat. If you press on a flat knife a little, it becomes concave (technically convex, but making a concave impression in the mud). So a lot of it is about feel and what works best for you.
 

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Let us know how the curved trowel works for you. I never got mine to work I know some people like them. I got mine when I decided to change from knives to trowels. I really tried to get it to work but never quite managed it. Seems like a hump was what I was trying to avoid, not make one. I changed to flat trowels and stayed with them so am just curious how it works for you.
ToolSeeker -

Ha! Ha! At the rate I'm learning, I think you'll be a mighty old man before I can tell you the curved trowel worked for me. I mean, if it looks bad later this week, it definitely isn't gonna be the trowel...

Thx for the vote of confidence, though!
 

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Couple quick notes about humps and curves: on butt joints, you can't avoid a hump, you're just trying to manage one. The only way to avoid a hump is to use back blocking, which of course isn't possible in the standard situation of a butt joint on a stud. So for some people, it can be easier to mud the joint with a cruved trowel than a flat one. But even for tapered seams or back blocked seams, keep in mind that joint compound tends to shrink somewhat, so leaving a little extra to shrink down can result in a flat joint. Also, using a flat and somewhat flexible knife can leave a concave joint even on a tapered seam because the pressure causes the knife to bend inward slightly. If you press on a curved trowel a little, it becomes flat. If you press on a flat knife a little, it becomes concave (technically convex, but making a concave impression in the mud). So a lot of it is about feel and what works best for you.
Jeff -

I understand everything you're saying. Just a disconnect between the knowledge and my hands. Very frustrating. I'm kind of a perfectionist who has an easy time paying attention to details but getting a reasonably smooth finish is killing me. I'd post pictures of my current skill level with mudding but it's too freaking embarrassing. I have learned, though, I definitely hate sanding!
 

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Using trowels eliminated a LOT of sanding for me over knives. Before you apply the next coat lay your knife almost flat against the wall this will scrap off the ridges left from preceding coat, and your next coat will fill the low spots. Remember the only coat that needs to be "perfectly" flat is the last one.
 
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