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Discussion Starter #1
I am wanting to paint a heck of a lot of chainlink. Has anyone ever done this before? I'm thinking that I could use some kind of enamel paint if I can get it in something bigger than a rattle-can.

Also, will I be able to clean the stuff out of my sprayer when finished?
 

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Too Short? Cut it Again!
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You are going to need to prime it and then paint it. If you don't prime it, the paint will not stick for long. I would use oil based for both primer and paint on a metal fence but acrylic over an alkyd finish would work too.

A conditioner like Pentrol (for oil/solvent based) or Floetrol (for water based) paint or primer will keep things flowing through your sprayer nicely. You will want to try and paint as close to parallel the surface to minimize waste and overspray drifting off.

Be sure and add touch up of the fence to your maintenance list. Cyclone/chainlink fences flex quite a bit and paint does not always want to flex with them.
 

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I painted a portion of my chain link fence thirty years ago. I picked up a couple of gallons of oil base aluminum paint, a 3/4 inch nap roller cover and went to town. It looked better the second and third years because it began to weather and looked more natural. The excess that dripped on the grass grew away in a couple of weeks. Be careful with the sprayer unless you’re in the open with no homes or cars nearby. I think you’d be better using a roller due to the fact the nap of the roller will wrap around the links, whereas spraying will only spray the surface directly in front. Just a thought. One coat lasted and looked good for about ten years.
 

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im going to second the roller.. on the links.. spray on the posts.. and get a backer board ( refrigerator cardboard and a few sticks set up like an easel if you dont have a laborer to hold it for ya)
 

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Chain link fence may be the toughest substrate to paint of all time. Did some backstops for a local high school a few years ago. I used SW's paint specially formulated for chain link fences. A thick napped roller works well although it's not so good at painting the crossbars. Even though I rolled it, paint splatters went everywhere especially when the wind blew.........I mean, I got it all over my truck parked 30 yards away. Make sure you cover EVERYTHING within striking distance. It's a monster of a job that's for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well DUH! I never even thought of using a roller. Spraying was on my mind and that was all I could think of. Thanks for pulling me out of the rut. I suppose I could do the posts and top rails with a cheap Wagner or something.

The reason I'm doing all this is because SWWBO thinks a green fence would greatly enhance the appearence of the property instead of that "uglyoldgraystuff":confused1:
 

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Too Short? Cut it Again!
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Even though I rolled it, paint splatters went everywhere especially when the wind blew.........I mean, I got it all over my truck parked 30 yards away. Make sure you cover EVERYTHING within striking distance. It's a monster of a job that's for sure.
I didn't mention rolling because I thought you were set on spraying it. But indeed rolling it is a mess too.

If you were going to get a sprayer for this? I cannot think of a better project for something like a Wagner that puts paint everywhere but where you want it to start.

Here is one other approach to think about. You could stain cedar or redwood lathe to the color of your choice and weave it in the links. The lathe you buy can be something less than a grade but set up a table saw and rip your own. Unless you really have like linear miles of fencing?

Think outside the box and weave something else colorful in through the chainlinks? A client bought unpunched vinyl from a blind manufacturer to weave through their fence around a pool until they could afford what they wanted. It looked nice for what it was.
 

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Very much not an expert here, but I'm going to throw this out for comments.

DH mentioned when he was stationed in Hong Kong many years ago, the local contractors would paint the ship's deck railing using rags dipped in paint.

What about a rubber glove to protect your hand, and a rag, or even something like an old winter mitten or car washing mitt to dip the paint in.
 
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