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Discussion Starter #1
Happy Monday!

I spent the weekend working on a bathroom reno specifically the drywall trying to get it ready to paint. The bathroom has a skylight which when I looked up I noticed some paint failures. I got the ladder out and took a closer look. The paint and primer all came off in certain areas. I didn't notice any water damage, but I know I need to add some insulation to the tunnel.

I have however noticed condensation forming on the glass. Some of the trim up there has also clearly been exposed to some condensation as well. Once I get everything back up to snuff would the trim at the skylight be a good place to use an oil based paint to protect it better? I've been using BM Advance so I would probably go back to BM Satin Impervo for the trim. Should I be considering an oil based product for the remainder of the tunnel, perhaps just the primer?
 

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The oil-based paint will offer up no more protection than latex. In fact, in an area that likely sees lots of sunlight and UV rays, oil-based paint would be a poor performer. Stick with the BM Advance. The paint is not the problem. It's the condensation and you need to figure out a way to stop that first.
 

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The condensation is going to be tricky, but if there is no advantage to another paint scheme then hey I'll continue using what I've been using. I do think I'll wait a bit before painting that area because with the frigid cold temps I doubt I'll get good adhesion.
 

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May be a hard area to dry out but make sure everything is really dry before you proceed.
 

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When I was building homes in the 90's, I put a skylight in a bathroom once, no more after that. The moisture in a bathroom, assuming there's a tub or shower in the room, causes condensation to form on the glass of the skylight. Then it would run down the shaft and cause issues with the drywall and molding. I have seen some installations where the builder installed a picture frame type molding around the bottom of the shaft opening, letting the molding overhang the opening about 1/2 - 3/4". Then they would drop in a piece of plexiglass cut to fit the shaft size, so the molding would hold it in place, like a drop ceiling grid does. This would keep the warm, moist air from hitting the cold glass and condensing.
Mike Hawkins:smile:
 

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May be a hard area to dry out but make sure everything is really dry before you proceed.
Yeah I think I might have it all prepped, but wait until warmer weather shows up before painting that section.

When I was building homes in the 90's, I put a skylight in a bathroom once, no more after that. The moisture in a bathroom, assuming there's a tub or shower in the room, causes condensation to form on the glass of the skylight. Then it would run down the shaft and cause issues with the drywall and molding. I have seen some installations where the builder installed a picture frame type molding around the bottom of the shaft opening, letting the molding overhang the opening about 1/2 - 3/4". Then they would drop in a piece of plexiglass cut to fit the shaft size, so the molding would hold it in place, like a drop ceiling grid does. This would keep the warm, moist air from hitting the cold glass and condensing.
Mike Hawkins:smile:
Yeah in general I'm not a skylight person because of the whole let's put a hole in the roof aspect, the bathroom is just adding to my dislike. It's also in a terrible spot because it's right outside the shower so I expect all of the steam to just travel right on up. I have two intake points on the vent for the room, but even still I'm not sure how well this will all work.
 
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