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Discussion Starter #1
I've been told to prime and paint the inside edge of my kitchen cabinets. I was going to use BIN primer and then the top coat only, but I got to thinking...

Does one also prime and paint the inside edge of the slot where the cutting board goes?

If so, won't you then tend to introduce paint onto your cutting board with wear and tear?
 

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I see no need to paint those slots. With use, the paint is going to get scraped off anyway, so why bother?

However, if you do choose to paint there, don't worry about paint getting in your food. It is completely inert, so if by some chance you did eat some, it is probably not going to hurt you.

SirWired
 

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It might be a good idea to seal those edges with something. I would think that the bigger concern is getting food/meat particles in there that would fester and be re-introduced into your cooking enviornment. I've never been a fan of the slide out cutting boards.

Each paint has an msds available online. I wouldn't go so far as to say all paints are inert after dry, especially something like bin, kilz or other solvent based material.

If you choose paint, make sure it's dry coating is non-toxic by researching the msds and product sheets.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
update...

Based on your advice here, I looked up the MSDS for BIN and the paint. The only "questionable" ingredients appear to be Titanium Dioxide and the carrying solvent (which cures away?).

I also sent an email request to the manufacturers. The paint maker was nice enough to get back to me and gave a standard (legaleese) reply, recommending that it not be used in areas where it will "likely delaminate (wear off) and contaminate (get into) food." {Don't you love the fancy wording!?!}

So I'll not apply the BIN and paint. But now, how do I seal the slots?
 

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When you talked with the mfg., it would have been prudent of him to tell you that there are usda approved paints for use in commercial kitchens.

Just about any paint store will have usda approved paint. With eco-consciousness rising, there are lots of products that are completely safe and non toxic. The question is, how about primers? You might consider skipping a primer, if you can't find a safe one, and just using paint.
 

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Based on your advice here, I looked up the MSDS for BIN and the paint. The only "questionable" ingredients appear to be Titanium Dioxide and the carrying solvent (which cures away?).

I also sent an email request to the manufacturers. The paint maker was nice enough to get back to me and gave a standard (legaleese) reply, recommending that it not be used in areas where it will "likely delaminate (wear off) and contaminate (get into) food." {Don't you love the fancy wording!?!}

So I'll not apply the BIN and paint. But now, how do I seal the slots?
Well, you certainly don't need to worry about the TiO2. This stuff is benign enough to be used as the pigment in white toothpaste. And yes, the solvent will cure away.

However, unless your cabinets are made of chipboard, and you put soaking wet cutting boards in them, why worry? I few drops of water here and there are not going to cause the wood to dissolve.

SirWired
 

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Discussion Starter #7
update #2

Got word back from Zinsser (re. BIN). and from the paint company (re. USDA-approval).
- re. BIN: basically, "not a problem, its just shellac with pigment. would not suggest ingesting the product or direct food contact. recommend a layer of paint as with any primer."
- re. USDA-approval: "USDA approval is for incidental food contact. The FDA approves coatings for direct contact with food. Our pain meets & is USDA-approved. BUT, given the likelihood of any paint chipping with the wear-and-tear common to these slots, we'd recommend against using ours."

My thot: use only the BIN/shellac, if anything.

What do you guys think?
 

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I always leave those alone
I treat them as a "food preparation area" (like the cutting board itself) and treat with mineral oil, along with the cutting board, if requested (after painting the rest)
That's it though
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I always leave those alone
I treat them as a "food preparation area" (like the cutting board itself) and treat with mineral oil, along with the cutting board, if requested (after painting the rest)
That's it though
That gives me an idea... to line the edge with nylon tape. It will essentially seal the edge, and provide mild lubrication without impacting the cuttingboard surface ...not unlike the mineral oil suggestion.

FYI, my cutting board in these slots will be sealed Richlite, an NSF-approved product (http://www.richlite.com/richlite/food_products.asp).
 
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