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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it acceptable to use a roller when painting six panel interior doors? My contractor used what they are calling a "wiz" and it has left tiny bumps all over the doors. They now have a sort of leather looking finish. My husband previously painted the doors with a brush and they came out nice and smooth. Shouldn't I expect the same finish done by a professional?
 

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If you did not specify what was to be used.........you end up getting what you got. If using a whiz roller, I usually backbrush through the paint to give it that glass-like finish. You could also spec them to spray.
 

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I liked doing panel doors, if using latex semi, with a nice quality 2.5 inch sash brush and Floetrol added to the paint. I used top notch paint too. And of course nice primer too. Not sure it is the right way but the crusty old geezers who taught me years ago had me start with inset panel trims of the door. Then the inset. Last the horizontal parts of the frame and finally the vertical ones.

For flat doors I used Floetrol and a thick 3/4 nap roller. chrisn who I respect a lot from comments does not believe I can git a smooth mirror like finish on doors with such a roller cover. I hope he responds to this with his approach.
 

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imo, generally speaking ,if door has a smooth brush finish than i give them a smooth brush finish.this is a perfect example of how a paint estimate can vary in price by hundreds of dollars depending on the amount of work. is this acceptable ? if it is neat and clean ,paint adhering,and a soft stipple some would say yes .would i do it that way? :no:
 

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I liked doing panel doors, if using latex semi, with a nice quality 2.5 inch sash brush and Floetrol added to the paint. I used top notch paint too. And of course nice primer too. Not sure it is the right way but the crusty old geezers who taught me years ago had me start with inset panel trims of the door. Then the inset. Last the horizontal parts of the frame and finally the vertical ones.

For flat doors I used Floetrol and a thick 3/4 nap roller. chrisn who I respect a lot from comments does not believe I can git a smooth mirror like finish on doors with such a roller cover. I hope he responds to this with his approach.
I still find it hard, but , if you say you can, then I guess you can. Me, I just use a 2 1/2 in brush:yes:

I do not think I would encourage a DYI to use a 3/4 nap for this project:eek:
 

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If you did not specify what was to be used.........you end up getting what you got. If using a whiz roller, I usually backbrush through the paint to give it that glass-like finish. You could also spec them to spray.
Not trying to fan any flame, but that's just plain wrong.

People generally hire a "pro" thinking they should know what they are doing. While I think everyone should try and be informed about projects before starting, you shouldn't have to spec every tiny detail about every little thing.
 

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Not trying to fan any flame, but that's just plain wrong.

People generally hire a "pro" thinking they should know what they are doing. While I think everyone should try and be informed about projects before starting, you shouldn't have to spec every tiny detail about every little thing.
That's not cut and dry. While I agree that not every little detail needs to be spec'd and that an HO would naturally assume the use of a brush, there are some details we don't know. Were the doors smooth or textured panels? What quality of material was used? I've used whizz's on textured panels with a quality finish at times, and as a perfectionist pro, I had no problem with them as the door texture absorbs the whizz texture. I've also used mohair whizz's on smooth doors that looked factory finished and beautiful. If the painter used a nappy whizz on a smooth surface door, that's wrong, and the HO is justified. What did the HO pay for the job? Was the painter a lowball, and the lowest price? Did the HO ask for a review/adjustment of the original price, whether lowball or not? I've adjusted prices before under certain situations, and changing from brushing to rolling doors might be a way to help reduce the price. Asking a contractor for a bid reduction is asking for less detailed work and acceptance of that fact is only realistic. The issue of price is vital, as most problems that HO's have with painters/finished products usually come down to the price they paid. We see it time and again. It's a widespread problem, so much so, that it motivates me to do what I'm currently doing. Go to my blog and read my about page. I'm not attacking the HO, and this may not be the case here, but if it is, it can be a valuable learning experience. People just don't know, and there I agree with you Joe, people need to educate themselves.
 

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I think after further review, " a Leather-like finish" to the doors means there is more than a problem with how the doors were finished. Maybe some bad paint was used.
 

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Not trying to fan any flame, but that's just plain wrong.

People generally hire a "pro" thinking they should know what they are doing. While I think everyone should try and be informed about projects before starting, you shouldn't have to spec every tiny detail about every little thing.
Joe you're not fanning a flame, but, think about this........the project went wrong right from the get-go due to lack of communication. The doors ended up with a "leather-like" finish. Did the painter ask questions? Did the HO? My first question would have been, "Would you like them to look as they did in the past.......with a glassy-smooth finish?" For all we know, the HO may have provided flat Dutch-Boy paint. Anyway, this story really went south because the communication was lacking in a big way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all the replies. We have been communicating pretty well. The project first went south when they didn't believe me when I told them that they were last painted with latex. The doors were in great shape. The only needed a freshening up and to match the color of the new crown molding that was installed. Because they convinced themselves that they were dealing with an oil paint, they decided to prime with a product that would allow them to convert to latex. The product was thick and when they brushed it on it left deep grooves from the brush strokes. It looked like an animal had been scratching the doors.
They tried to remedy this by hand sanding but they couldn't get the finish smooth. Finally they had to use an electric sander to almost get back to bare wood. That at least got back to a smooth feel. Then they primed and rolled the doors with one coat and no back brushing. We no longer have the deep grooves. They have been replaced with stipple. We just want to get back to where we began.
Thanks again to everyone. Your comments have been much appreciated.
 

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Miche, I am sorry this project did not turn out the way you wanted. Now, hearing more of your story, it makes much more sense. It sounds as if you communicated your wishes quite well. I wonder what type of primer they used? In a case like this I like a bonding primer which goes on dead flat. Then, you can topcoat with whatever you want, latex or oil. I prefer a SG or high gloss for doors.......SW's Proclassic goes on buttery smooth and dries to a glassy, high gloss finish. At least your painters are making strides to correct their mistakes.
 

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I still find it hard, but , if you say you can, then I guess you can. Me, I just use a 2 1/2 in brush:yes:

I do not think I would encourage a DYI to use a 3/4 nap for this project:eek:
Fair enough response and I have painted most panel doors with a 2.5 angled sash brush.

You are correct, a 3/4 nap roller cover should probably not be put in the hands of a DIYer. I do wish I could shake your skepticism and get you to try the approach to cabinet and other flat doors. Crusty old painter older than both of us taught me. Floetrol, nice paint, some urethane stirred in.

Thanks Chris. :thumbup:
 

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Thanks for all the replies. We have been communicating pretty well. The project first went south when they didn't believe me when I told them that they were last painted with latex. The doors were in great shape. The only needed a freshening up and to match the color of the new crown molding that was installed. Because they convinced themselves that they were dealing with an oil paint, they decided to prime with a product that would allow them to convert to latex. The product was thick and when they brushed it on it left deep grooves from the brush strokes. It looked like an animal had been scratching the doors.
They tried to remedy this by hand sanding but they couldn't get the finish smooth. Finally they had to use an electric sander to almost get back to bare wood. That at least got back to a smooth feel. Then they primed and rolled the doors with one coat and no back brushing. We no longer have the deep grooves. They have been replaced with stipple. We just want to get back to where we began.
Thanks again to everyone. Your comments have been much appreciated.
Hi Miche99, I'm sorry to hear about your dilemna. It's an unfortunate situation in which you have plenty of company. The first thing you can do to get back where you began is to fire the painters. In spite of what they may claim, or what you think, or what they've charged, they are not pros. Firstly, I could have proved/disproved latex in all of about the time it took me to get to my truck and grab some denatured alcohol and a rag. They "decided" which says to me they had no clue/plan until they showed up. In order to give you a price, the contractor has to know how many coats he has to apply. A six panel door is about as basic as they come. A few minutes to sand it and dust it, and fifteen minutes to paint it. A standard six panel door and frame is one half hour to paint plus prep time per coat. Even if the primer was going on thick, a competent painter would have seen that right away and corrected for it, probably as soon as he dipped his brush. Any "painter" who would think they could sand brushmarks out by hand, on a whole door, has never sanded brush marks. Do I need to continue? I could. I've seen this movie before. I don't mean to sound harsh or critical. They are what they are, a bane to this trade, and unsuspecting consumers. No one, neither you nor I, is going to change them. There's no sense in trying to figure them out, as they should be someone else's problem after today. What you can try to figure out is why they ended up in your house. There's a glitch in your selection/hiring process. My first indication that price was an issue was when you stated that your husband painted the doors prior. In my experience, those who do their own painting are those, mostly, who find it hardest to understand/accept legitimate painting contract prices. Because it's sooooo easy. So they think. And they consequently get burned. How many stories do you have time for? Some of them refuse to learn and it becomes a continuing saga, trade after trade, individual contractor after another. There is a search function on this forum and you can find info on hiring painting contractors to help you in the future. Sorry to be so blunt, but dishonesty, or telling you what you want to hear, isn't going to help you or your problem. People get hurt by what you don't tell them. You may think me presumptuous, that's okay. Because, if it doesn't boil down to price, I'll take the next best reason for four hundred Alex, your painter is an unemployed family member or son of a good friend. With all due respect and best wishes.
PS I would have them sand the doors smooth again, thank them, and have your husband paint them.
 
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