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I would like to use the Advance Alkyd product as top coat on cupboard doors. My problem is they are currently raw MDF. I can not use waterborne primer on raw MDF and the Advance Alkyd is not recommended for use on solvent based surfaces. Can anyone recommend a solution? I am not looking for a glossy look. The MDF doors have been professionally manufactured and routed. I was thinking that a coat of oil based primer, then prime over that with waterborne primer, then two coats of the Alkyd product. Does anyone have experience with this
 

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I would like to use the Advance Alkyd product as top coat on cupboard doors. My problem is they are currently raw MDF. I can not use waterborne primer on raw MDF and the Advance Alkyd is not recommended for use on solvent based surfaces. Can anyone recommend a solution? I am not looking for a glossy look. The MDF doors have been professionally manufactured and routed. I was thinking that a coat of oil based primer, then prime over that with waterborne primer, then two coats of the Alkyd product. Does anyone have experience with this

You will not have issues with Advance used over a properly applied solvent based primer. Not sure where you heard that from but it is incorrect.

You can prime with the following BenjaminMoore solvent based primers:
024 multipurpose oil
217 oil based undercoater (my first choice)
PrimeLock Plus

You can also use BIN or Coverstain.
 

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Thank you very much coco. Here is the quote from the Benjamin Moore website that concerned me.


Wood surfaces:*ADVANCE Waterborne Interior Alkyd Primer (K790)*tinted to the approximate finish coat colourLaminates:*Fresh Start® High-Hiding All Purpose Primer (K046)Do not use lacquer-based primers or undercoaters, as they can impede how ADVANCE adheres to the surface.


It says do not use lacquer based primers. So I guess it's not all solvent based primers that are a concern...Just not the lacquer. If that is true I am beyond relieved!
 

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Also I keep reading that met edges need to be treated. My doors don't appear to have any rough looking edges as they have been routed and are smooth looking. I am confused if I still need to do this.
 

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Thank you very much coco. Here is the quote from the Benjamin Moore website that concerned me.


Wood surfaces:*ADVANCE Waterborne Interior Alkyd Primer (K790)*tinted to the approximate finish coat colourLaminates:*Fresh Start® High-Hiding All Purpose Primer (K046)Do not use lacquer-based primers or undercoaters, as they can impede how ADVANCE adheres to the surface.


It says do not use lacquer based primers. So I guess it's not all solvent based primers that are a concern...Just not the lacquer. If that is true I am beyond relieved!

Correct. lacquer undercoaters cause surface tension issues with advance and many other waterborne finishes. Oil based primers are compatible with pretty much all topcoat finishes with some exceptions given mainly with industrial products.

From the Data sheet:
"Wood and Engineered Wood Products: Primer:Advance®Waterborne Interior Alkyd Primer (790), Fresh Start®High-Hiding All Purpose Primer (046) or Fresh Start Multi-Purpose Oil BasedPrimer (024) Finish:1 or 2 coats Advance®Waterborne Interior Alkyd Satin (792)"



There are plenty of primers you can use but in particular I would use the 217 undercoater on raw MDF. Seals raw MDF, flows, levels and sands nicely.


All surfaces should be primed and top coated, especially raw MDF.
 
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