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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need some advice on best way to paint some fresh stucco patches.

Location is Miami Florida so yes very humid and hot this time of the year.

Here are a few pictures of the new stucco with and the vertical line textures. The brown color is the existing 40 year old painted stucco, the gray color is the new stucco.







I have several areas that have been patched with matching patterns.

(1) How long should I wait for the fresh stucco to cure before I should primt and paint over it? 1 week? or 28 days like "standard" concrete?

(2) Due to the texture, it is going to be difficult to cover the grooves even with a thick nap roller. I am thinking I need to roll on liberally, then a brush to make sure I have total coverage?

(3) Would it be better to tint the primer to the finished color to get better results?

(4) There is a lot of hype at local home centers on 1 coat prime and paint products. Thoughts? I am going to do multiple coats, was thinking 1 coat of prime plus 2 coats of paint, but would two coats of prime&paint be worse, same, better?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
OK I dragged my feet a bit and am ready to go on this project.

On getting nice and even coverage on this textured stucco with grooves, I am thinking once the roller goes over the wall, the textures and grooves may not be fully covered? I am going to have to run a brush over the grooves right? Will 3/4" nap rollers be the best? Or even longer like 1" or 1.5"?

If I tint the primer to be the same color (brown), once I get the primer coat on, how can I tell what's been finished coated and what's not? I wonder if I might get easily confused.

I have a total of about 280SF of exterior wall space to prime/paint. But that is from measurements based on a smooth wall. A paint calculator estimated that to require 0.8 gallon. With the textures I need more...how much more? Can I get away with 1 gallon of primer?

Masking the windows - after I primed the window sill, head and jamb, do I remove the masking tapes, then apply new tape, then paint first coat, remove tape, apply new tape, paint second coat, remove tape? Or can I leave the tape on until the final coat? If I did that wouldn't the paint "skin over" and when I peel off the tape it would tear some of the paint?
 

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3/4 nap is plenty. As you stated, just follow up with your brush to push the paint into the grooves. Primer is never tinted to the EXACT topcoat color. It will be 30 - 50 % of the the topcoat color so you will be able to see where you are painting easily. When masking, I just leave the tape on since you are doing multiple passes of primer and paint. It just takes more care when removing it. Have a snap-knife ready to free up any snags.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
One thing I worry is when I put on the tinted primer, I can see where the primer may not have coverage in the grooves and I will probably use a brush to make a nice even coverage of the grooves, guess I will find out. Is there a special kind of 3/4" nap rollers I should get to maximize having to brush finish the grooves?

But when I get to the actual finish coat, I am wondering if I will be able to tell where the finish coat may not be spreading into the grooves of the texture, since the tinted primer, with the recessed grooves, may not look visibly appreciable.
 

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One thing I worry is when I put on the tinted primer, I can see where the primer may not have coverage in the grooves and I will probably use a brush to make a nice even coverage of the grooves, guess I will find out. Is there a special kind of 3/4" nap rollers I should get to maximize having to brush finish the grooves?

But when I get to the actual finish coat, I am wondering if I will be able to tell where the finish coat may not be spreading into the grooves of the texture, since the tinted primer, with the recessed grooves, may not look visibly appreciable.
The primer is not made to "cover" and it will not. The finish coats will cover ;and a 3/4 nap will be more than enough to get in the grooves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am running into an issue. I am going to hold off primer the rest of it until the storm passes this weekend but I tested a section of the wall.

This vertical texture is giving me a headache. It was textured this way on the entire exterior and courtyard perimeter so I don't have a choice.

At the bottom of the masonry wall is a clay tile deck. I want to make sure the paint will not smear or bleed into the porous clay tiles. So I put some masking tape down but the masking tape doesn't stick to clay very well. Then I put some tarp down and went to work. I soaked the 3/4" roller really well, then rolled it back and forth on the tray then rolled the primer on. Because of the texture, as I roll the primer on, some of the paint is "rolling" down the grooves...the front surface of the wall looks great, the grooves look OK just I see some paint in the grooves slowing rolling down. These grooves are kinda like the fuller of a sword. Some of it rolled to the bottom and form a bead. I am sure if I let it sit it will bleed under the tape.

I am not sure what I can do about this...use rollers only from say three feet from the bottom and up, and make sure the roller is not too wet, and immediately use a brush to spread/finish the primer/paint inside the grooves? Then use a brush for the bottom section? Any good ideas?





 

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Yes, as stated before, you will have to brush those grooves. I know, it sucks, but, there's not really another recourse here. I don't even think a sprayer would help much in this case. It's just one of those things. Roll to get the paint into the grooves and meticulously watch for the runs especially near the bottom and brush them out. You are doing a great job of getting the primer into the grooves, by the way. Just keep a wet rag handy for those runs that make it to the clay flooring.
 
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