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Hello:
I have a small basement ceiling that I need to paint black. Wires, pipes, duct work, etc. will all get painted. Anyone have any experience with those cheap siphon spray guns? I don't want to rent a sprayer since it's too cold out right now for me to be able to clean it properly.
Thanks.
 

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Yes, a cheap Wagner type sprayer will do the trick. Just make absolutely sure you have all dirt and dust removed from any of the wood to be painted as there is nothing worse than applying paint over dust and then the paint does not adhere properly. The cheap paint sprayers will work but just expect to throw it away after one use, that's about all they are good for. You could also consider renting one..........
 

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last Wagner I used you had to have an attachment for overhead spraying, the gun had to be level to work right.But that's been a while I have never been a fan of handheld sprayers.
 

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Having the right equipment and having cleaned the surface as advised above, there still may be another problem. You sid it's too cold. Be sure the room you are painting in is warm and has proper ventilation to promote proper dry/cure conditions. Your new paint job can fail in cold, damp conditions.
 

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This is ironic if that's the right word. I was just reading a post over on paint talk about painting a basement ceiling black and this may interest Mr. Paint and Ric knows paint. I'm curious to see response.
They recommended using dryfall paint. I questioned this because I was always told dryfall needed at least 12' to work. They told me it wasn't recommended because of the drywall properties but because of the flatness(if that's a word) and hide ability especially in black. Your opinions please.
 

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Dryfalls are very heavy on pigmentation and very light on resin. That is why they are not recommended for walls; they burnish easily when touched. Most are recommended for industrial applications where there is an 18' or more ceiling. They are not designed for residential use.

They are available in oil-base (In the free world) .or latex. Latex droplets will dry on the outside as they fall, but may burst if stepped on too soon. Dropping is always advised for these. The oils I remember were a hotter synthetic and dried rapidly int little crispy critters before they landed on the floor.

Whites are very reflective. We., and most manufacturers also offer black, both available in flat or eggshell.
 

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This is ironic if that's the right word. I was just reading a post over on paint talk about painting a basement ceiling black and this may interest Mr. Paint and Ric knows paint. I'm curious to see response.
They recommended using dryfall paint. I questioned this because I was always told dryfall needed at least 12' to work. They told me it wasn't recommended because of the drywall properties but because of the flatness(if that's a word) and hide ability especially in black. Your opinions please.
Hiya TS,

A couple of weeks ago, this same discussion came up 'bout painting basement ceilings black. I recommended the guy at least consider a black latex dryfall, if for no other reason than it is usually inexpensive - and as a reasonably apropos product since we weren't talking about a signature type job. In the same discussion, I also spoke of other options such as latex flat wall paints black (factory grind, not tinted), exterior flat latex house paints, exterior latex SC stain, and latex fence paint black...

I spoke of the distance necessary for product to fall as a powder AND I kind of alluded to the potential problems using such a product (as well as any of the other products mentioned) without necessary surface prep and priming. Then I told him what I would do if it were my house - which was to do everything a manufacturer recommends to not do...

Dryfalls are not made for porous substrates. They are primarily intended for application on steel decking in commercial/industrial environments. Their primary purpose (white) is to maximize light reflection/illumination in environments not conducive to such co-operation...Black is typically used to hide things, and is commonly used in restaurants, convention centers, sports arenas, etc - those type of facilities where exposed ceilings are common, but owners don't necessarily want noticed.

Flat dryfalls usually do dry to a "dead" flat...unlike that of even wall paints. Wall paints usually have little bit of angular sheen - especially in black 'cause there's not a lot of built in filler pigments to absorb binder (necessary to render a flatter finish)...and dryfalls generally are somewhat high hiding products*, but nothing hides better than black, and since this is an exposed joist ceiling of multifaceted surfaces, would an angular sheen be an issue?...or even noticed?
* Dryfalls hide as much by excessive film build as they do by pigment structure. Since a common app of dryfall is on corrugated steel and bar joist, 35' off the floor, in a 400,000 square foot warehouse - painting contractors will always apply product at 1.5 to 2 times the thickness of a more conventional coating since running lifts and crews to apply a second coat would be financial suicide.

There is nothing magical about dryfall products. Typical dryfall paints are not known for their structural integrity - and whatever integrity they do possess will be lessened by applying to a porous substrate. Dryfalls will always be considered a compromise system between appearance and performance, but that trade-off is generally understood and accepted by those in the commercial/industrial realm.
 
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