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I have been trying to find info on painting exterior aluminum siding and havent found the info i need. so if one of the painting experts could give me some advise it would be greatly appreciated. i need to know how to prep, best supplies to use, and best way to apply.

thanks in advance
 

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I will post the cruel and hard truth that everyone on here is passing on.

Hire a pro. Not only a "PRO" because everyone says they are one, buit one with proof of references and photos of this type of job. If you are not used to coating aluminum/metal it will be a nightmare for you. Most likely you will not get the results you are desiring. If the slightest amount of heat gets on the aluminum your paint will not spread properly and be gummed up.

There is so many other reasons to say, but one still stands true...


Please hire a professional From your local area.
 

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Power Wash it thoroughly. Rub your hand on it. If it's chalky, then your first coat can be primer or paint, but MUST have Emulsabond added to it. Do Not skip that step or you will be in trouble.
 

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Power Wash it thoroughly. Rub your hand on it. If it's chalky, then your first coat can be primer or paint, but MUST have Emulsabond added to it. Do Not skip that step or you will be in trouble.
If you wash it and its still chalky you did a bad job washing. You must wash until there is NO chalk left. Emulsabond is an additive that will void the manufactures warranty of the material.

A good rule of thumb is wile you are washing - look at the water running down the siding. if its chalky then its still dirty. wash until the runoff is clear. This may take some agitation with a stiff bristled brush and some cleaner to make the job go faster. Prep is very important when coating any substrate.

you do not ever have to use a primer on aluminum siding (unless you are painting safety red - then a gray primer will make it cover better)

apply two (2) coats of high end exterior acrylic satin with an airless sprayer. Do not brush the material - it will look like crap.

so, unless you own a 3200 psi (or higher) pressure washer, an airless sprayer, ladders and masking tools you should probably hire someone.

I have painted over 300 aluminum sided houses in the Cleveland area. the only time I have had material failure is when i painted a previously coated house that was not prepped properly. That is why most painting contractors will not warranty a previously coated substrate.
 

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Kellster
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Power wash and remove chalk. No need to prime it. I use Sherwin-Williams Duration Satin. A very high quality acrylic paint.

Best finish look would be to spray it using an airless sprayer.
 

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Use Emulsabond. I don't see how somone who has painted 300 Aluminum houses can not recommend Emulsabond. That is just inexperience.

Walk into a paint store and see what they will recommend to you.
 

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Use Emulsabond. I don't see how somone who has painted 300 Aluminum houses can not recommend Emulsabond. That is just inexperience.

Walk into a paint store and see what they will recommend to you.
I prefer to prep a house correctly and not take shortcuts that void the manufactures warranty on material.

Walk into a paint store and ask them what happens when you add a Flood product to a Sherwin Williams, ICI, Benny Moore product.

If its chalky its not clean. paint is designed to go over a clean, sound substrate. so, having painted all of the houses I have without failure by doing the proper prep; why would i use a product that voids the manufactures warranty on material? apparently you are just lazy or do not know how to wash the chalk off of an aluminum house. I am going to bet both.
 

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Kellster
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Be Nice

Lets be nice fellas. If we were experts we wouldn't need this forum. It's o.k if someone has different ideas on the correct product to successfully tackle a project. Sometimes there is more than one way to it correctly.

That is why we are here
 

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I'm trying to play nice but this guy keeps coming in threads posting bad advice and insulting people. He already got put in his place when he recommended people not use oil primer on bare wood and then said Kilz was the Industry Standard for smoke damage. This kid has clearly never seen what latex primer looks like on bare wood after 5 years or more with knots showing through.

He has a very condescending tone to his posts like he is the All-Mighty of painting and everyone else is a bunch of idiots. He needs to actually do a little research on products before he goes around running his mouth off.
 

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I am having a hard time understanding why anyone would paint over a chalky surface.

The data pages on all paint materials reads:

Aluminum and Galvanized Steel
Wash to remove any oil, grease, or other
surface contamination. All corrosion must
be removed with sandpaper, steel wool,
or other abrading method

Chalk would be a surface contaminate.
 

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That is a more civilized post. Thank you Nav. The thing is, you would have to scrub the siding with a brush to really remove all the chalking, and that would only be temporary. The original paint used on aluminum siding is designed to do exactly, chalk, that so it always looks white as any surface dust and dirt and whatnot falls off with the chalking. You can hit the siding with the most powerfull pressure washer in the world, then rub it with your hand, and you are still gonna get white on your hand from chalking.
 

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Haste Makes Waste
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Chalk is the residue of the existing paint or finish rather than a surface contaminant. Excess chalk should be removed, but all chalk cannot be removed.
 

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Drywall and Painting Pro
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Chalk is the residue of the existing paint or finish rather than a surface contaminant. Excess chalk should be removed, but all chalk cannot be removed.
Believe it or not, you can put a clear masonry sealer on metal or wood to get rid of any chalky ness! :yes:
 
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