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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am in the process of painting crown molding (3 steps) in the master bedroom. The crown molding was already painted white about 15 years ago. Since it now looks faded and 'grey', it needs new paint.

I am using Behr Premium Plus Pure White semi-gloss, and it seems that I am having to really work with it to get it to cover well. It is taking me FOREVER to paint this. About 3 hours to paint 25 linear feet of 10" crown.

Is the paint the problem or me? or both?

I was thinking of switching over to some Sherwin Williams SuperPaint semi-gloss. Will that make a difference or am I just wasting my money?

Thanks in advance.
 

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NACE Coating Inspector
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take the paint back. get the SW paint and some good brushes and rollers while you are there. good paint, surface prep and quality tools will give quality results with less effort..
 

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im not a fan of behr paint:no:.but with that said imo you would have the same out come starting out s/w super paint:yes: .between grey and white the difference is night and day. it is not uncommon to to start with a primer coat then one to two top coat, with out a primer 2 coats min. their is a skill to doing trim and the application plays a major role in any kind of paint coverage:wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The crown was painted white in 1996. Would that not be considered primed? It just looks like a dull white (grey) because the paint is so old.
 

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Definitely get some SW Proclassic. Also, crown can be a bit of a behr to paint because of the rounded surfaces you are covering. There's a tendency for any kind of paint to go on a little thin on curves and sharp/crisp edges. Many times I have had to apply 3 coats to crown to get it covered properly.
 

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Tileguy
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I would have cleaned the crown with TSP and then lightly scuffed it with sandpaper first. There is no telling what has accumulated on the old paint over the years. I wouldn't think you could just open the paint can and go to painting.:) A quality sash brush would also be helpful.:)
 

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Definitely get some SW Proclassic. Also, crown can be a bit of a behr to paint because of the rounded surfaces you are covering. There's a tendency for any kind of paint to go on a little thin on curves and sharp/crisp edges. Many times I have had to apply 3 coats to crown to get it covered properly.
Gymschu, a little known prep technique for new trim is to take some paper and soften those crisp edges up prior to prime. It would generally be considered a waste of time by most contractors and not in the budget but it solves the issue of shadowy corners/edges. I always plan for that.
 

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paper hanger and painter
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Definitely get some SW Proclassic. Also, crown can be a bit of a behr to paint because of the rounded surfaces you are covering. There's a tendency for any kind of paint to go on a little thin on curves and sharp/crisp edges. Many times I have had to apply 3 coats to crown to get it covered properly.

Typo!:laughing::laughing:
 

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Too Short? Cut it Again!
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The paint brand you have is certainly a big part of the problem. Roughing edges is not the hidden technique suggested but great advice. It is the way I learned to do things with trim, new or old.

Your other challenge is that it sounds like you have been using a factory mixed, white white. I used to use buckets of Benjamin Moore's super white or whatever in the contractor grade. The few drops of gray/black umber pigment made a world of difference in coverage. White white was just too stark against any wall color anyhow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
The paint brand you have is certainly a big part of the problem. Roughing edges is not the hidden technique suggested but great advice. It is the way I learned to do things with trim, new or old.

Your other challenge is that it sounds like you have been using a factory mixed, white white. I used to use buckets of Benjamin Moore's super white or whatever in the contractor grade. The few drops of gray/black umber pigment made a world of difference in coverage. White white was just too stark against any wall color anyhow.
I bought the SW SuperPaint Semi-Gloss plain white (whatever is their standard white without tint). Seems to cover much better, but you still have to work with it a little (probably due to the sharp edges and round parts), but not near as bad as that Behr paint!

Should I not be using a pure white color on the crown? I thought the norm was to use what matches the door casings, base boards, doors, etc....which in this case is a pure white. Can you mix the crown color with what the rest of trim in your house is painted?

I know in our old home the builder used a Duron paint called 'Florida White', which was a creamy white, but that same color was used on all the trim and crown molding throughout the house.

Here is the main color we are using on the walls:
http://www.sherwin-williams.com/do_it_yourself/paint_colors/ideas/color/SW6085_simplify_beige/

And here is the accent color on the tray wall steps:
http://www.sherwin-williams.com/do_it_yourself/paint_colors/ideas/color/SW6086_sand_dune/

And do we go with semi-gloss or full gloss? What is the usual? Semi-gloss?

Thanks for the suggestions.
 

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Too Short? Cut it Again!
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Not suggesting your crown needs to look grey or dingy. Or that you have to go way off white. I was just suggesting that a couple drops of black or umber in the mix will cover better.

As for semi or full gloss? The only full gloss paint for interior trim I would use was made by MAB. Sherwin Williams acquired MAB so don't know if it is still around.

Semi-gloss will do just fine with a nice soft sash brush. I toss a few drops of Floetrol in for a finish that almost looks like I painted with oil based products.

As suggested, buy nice brushes and good paint materials from a paint store and you will be fine.
 

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its called s/w extra white ,you could use a dover ,alabaster ,snowbound ,off the top of head to name a few.you would look at them and say their white .with the small amount of tint in them it does cover better but only slightly.the paint you have now extra white is what i use 99percent of the time on all trim in a semigloss.all trim extra white semigloss,walls super paint flat ,or satin,either one your be ok.myself for a showcase room i like flat,but satin will give you almost the same look but with a little more washabilty.of the beiges you choose are nice i dont know what effect your going with but imo theses colors are to much the same to see any difference ,try choosing a color 2 or 3 shades darker.than the lighter shade p/s yea use it on the crown and all trim
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Wow. Just finished with the top level of crown. SW extra white semi-gloss SuperPaint went on like a dream. I FLEW through it. Way, way better than Behr Premium Plus. I just can't believe the difference.

Next are the two lower levels of ceilings, then the two lower levels of crown, then the remainder of the upper walls.

Whew.

This room is turning out to be a lot of work but it is really starting to pop.
 

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Learning by Doing
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Good! Now we demand pics of your hard work! :thumbup: Keep at it!!!
 
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