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I painted my oak doors white using the behr Primer/paint white combo. Now three out of the four doors including some pine trim work is turning yellow. I may have also mixed paints after running out of behr I switched to glidden Primer/paint combo. I can't remember which doors are strictly behr and which ones got both coats. Could this be a painting mismatch issue or are the new oak doors out gassing? The doors are not pure Oak them seem to be the particle board innards with the oak veneer.
 

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Tannin? Smoke? Is it spotty or is the whole surface changing color? Can it be cleaned off, or is it coming from underneath the paint? Were there any knots in the pine? (I assume not, but just asking) Do you have pictures?

I know the can says you can do it, but I wouldn't trust either of those products to block bleeding wood.
 

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Dark oak should have been primed. Now you understand why we kabitz about labeling paint and primer in one. It's simply not true. Does it work, sure as long as your painting over paint where you really don't need primer anyway.

What you are seeing is the dark stain bleeding thru. About the only fix is to sand, then prime, then re-paint.
 

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Dark oak should have been primed. Now you understand why we kabitz about labeling paint and primer in one. It's simply not true. Does it work, sure as long as your painting over paint where you really don't need primer anyway.

What you are seeing is the dark stain bleeding thru. About the only fix is to sand, then prime, then re-paint.
let me guess-"wally world?"
 

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Dark oak should have been primed. Now you understand why we kabitz about labeling paint and primer in one. It's simply not true. Does it work, sure as long as your painting over paint where you really don't need primer anyway.

What you are seeing is the dark stain bleeding thru. About the only fix is to sand, then prime, then re-paint.
Prime with oil, I assume.
 

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Not really, oil is good for penetrating but with the paint already on it can't penetrate so just a scruff sand to rough the surface then Zinzer 123 or any good primer will work.
 

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I painted my oak doors white using the behr Primer/paint white combo. Now three out of the four doors including some pine trim work is turning yellow. I may have also mixed paints after running out of behr I switched to glidden Primer/paint combo. I can't remember which doors are strictly behr and which ones got both coats. Could this be a painting mismatch issue or are the new oak doors out gassing? The doors are not pure Oak them seem to be the particle board innards with the oak veneer.
"yeah! Wally World!" Behr paint? Yup behrs paint!
 

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I'd think that anything that made it through the water-based paint would have a good chance of making it through another coat of what is, basically, just more water-based paint (the latex primer), and that oil might have a better chance of blocking it.
 

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I painted my oak doors white

this result might be karma for committing a blasphemous act, :no:,

but I am sure as already mentioned a good stain blocking primer followed by a top coat and the doors will be beautiful :thumbup:
(hope you didn't paint the hinges)
 

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I'd think that anything that made it through the water-based paint would have a good chance of making it through another coat of what is, basically, just more water-based paint (the latex primer), and that oil might have a better chance of blocking it.
not really, stain blocking primers(123) are made to do just that and they work fine
 

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Havoc88:

Red oak has a lot of tannins in it which give it much of it's distinctive colour. These tannins are soluble in water, so they'll often bleed through a latex primer. Tannins aren't soluble in mineral spirits or alchohol, so an alkyd primer or BIN Shellac primer would probably have prevented that discolouration from happening.

That discolouration MIGHT also have been caused by incompatability between the two paints that were mixed. Generally, though, if incompatability causes a problem in paint, the result is usually something called "flashing" where the gloss of the paint varies substantially from one place to the next.
 
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