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Discussion Starter #1
I painted my bathroom doors and changed out all the hardware, hinges included. It looks great but now the doors won't close without some effort and the closet door you can see where there is a much larger gap at the bottom then at the top. Could painting the door have caused this? Any suggestions on fixing them?
 

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Really old doors with many layers of paint?
100% sure the same doors where put back in the same openings.
100% sure the hindges are sitting flush?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
joecaption said:
Really old doors with many layers of paint?
100% sure the same doors where put back in the same openings.
100% sure the hindges are sitting flush?
There was only one layer of paint then I paint it once, hated it, then painted again the next week. Not all the hinges are flushed neither are all the screws. The door are in the same opening.
 

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That can be the reason there now sticking. It does not take much.
Figure out why there not flush.
 

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I painted my bathroom doors and changed out all the hardware, hinges included. It looks great but now the doors won't close without some effort and the closet door you can see where there is a much larger gap at the bottom then at the top. Could painting the door have caused this? Any suggestions on fixing them?

no:no:

get the hinges flush and the screws sunk
 

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As Joe Sheridan stated, you really have to put the hinges back in exactly the same place that they came from. In other words, the hinge that was on the bottom should go back on the bottom, the hinge that was in the middle needs to go back to the middle. This happens quite often when doing kitchen cabinets. Hinges get bent a certain way or were altered to make a door close properly, etc. When reassembling the door hardware you can lose track of what goes where and you end up with a "misfit." This MAY have happened in this case. Now you may have to tweek your carpentry skills and re-router where the hinges go to make these doors close flush again. The paint DID NOT cause this!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Gymschu said:
As Joe Sheridan stated, you really have to put the hinges back in exactly the same place that they came from. In other words, the hinge that was on the bottom should go back on the bottom, the hinge that was in the middle needs to go back to the middle. This happens quite often when doing kitchen cabinets. Hinges get bent a certain way or were altered to make a door close properly, etc. When reassembling the door hardware you can lose track of what goes where and you end up with a "misfit." This MAY have happened in this case. Now you may have to tweek your carpentry skills and re-router where the hinges go to make these doors close flush again. The paint DID NOT cause this!!!
I'm changing all the hardware from bronze to brushed nickel so I can't put the old ones back. I've read that I could place a level on the door to make sure it's level and use one 3 inch screw in the top hinge only to pull the door back into alignment. Im glad to hear its not the paint.
 

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If those hindges are not flush it can be as simple as the hindge is slighty bigger then the old ones.
Just use a razer knife to mark where some wood needs to be removed. Remove the hindge and remove the extra wood with a razer knife or a wood chisle.
Adding a longer screw will only work if it's placed in the right spot.
Were to put it depends on where the door is off. EG top or bottom.
When checking for plumb you check the hindge side jamb with a long level not the door it's self.
 

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Hey tt,

How old is the house/doors. Years ago before prehung doors, when carpenters would hang a door they would use all sorts of techniques to balance the opening. When removing the hinges from an old door do it carefully, paying close attention to what’s behind the hinges. As Joe said, it’s the last thing you want to do. Often times you’ll see little pieces of cardboard or even pieces of shims behind the hinge. Some things are better left untouched.

Today with the advent of prehung doors, you won’t have that problem. Everything is done by calibrated jigs. Each door is the same as the one before it and after it. Continue to tinker with the adjustment and it will get better.
 

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Hey tt,

How old is the house/doors. Years ago before prehung doors, when carpenters would hang a door they would use all sorts of techniques to balance the opening. When removing the hinges from an old door do it carefully, paying close attention to what’s behind the hinges. As Joe said, it’s the last thing you want to do. Often times you’ll see little pieces of cardboard or even pieces of shims behind the hinge. Some things are better left untouched.

Today with the advent of prehung doors, you won’t have that problem. Everything is done by calibrated jigs. Each door is the same as the one before it and after it. Continue to tinker with the adjustment and it will get better.
YES! Exactamundo.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
spraygunn said:
Hey tt,

How old is the house/doors. Years ago before prehung doors, when carpenters would hang a door they would use all sorts of techniques to balance the opening. When removing the hinges from an old door do it carefully, paying close attention to what’s behind the hinges. As Joe said, it’s the last thing you want to do. Often times you’ll see little pieces of cardboard or even pieces of shims behind the hinge. Some things are better left untouched.

Today with the advent of prehung doors, you won’t have that problem. Everything is done by calibrated jigs. Each door is the same as the one before it and after it. Continue to tinker with the adjustment and it will get better.
It's a twenty year old house
 

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Discussion Starter #13
spraygunn said:
Hey tt,

How old is the house/doors. Years ago before prehung doors, when carpenters would hang a door they would use all sorts of techniques to balance the opening. When removing the hinges from an old door do it carefully, paying close attention to what’s behind the hinges. As Joe said, it’s the last thing you want to do. Often times you’ll see little pieces of cardboard or even pieces of shims behind the hinge. Some things are better left untouched.

Today with the advent of prehung doors, you won’t have that problem. Everything is done by calibrated jigs. Each door is the same as the one before it and after it. Continue to tinker with the adjustment and it will get better.
There was nothing behind the door when I removed the hinges. I did purchase a chisel and a three inch screw to hopefully correct the problem. The greatest space between the door and jamb is at the top, I have to lift the door up and slightly over to get it too close.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
UPDATE!!
After having to chisel 4 mortise, drill 6 three inch screw and removing the hinges countless times the doors finally open and close as they should. I can truly appreciate the phrase time is money. It took me six hours, and three store trips, to get both doors right.
 

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I feel your pain! I think everyone who said don't remove hinges knows exactly what you went through.
Experience can be a harsh mistress!

Glad they're working!
 

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UPDATE!!
After having to chisel 4 mortise, drill 6 three inch screw and removing the hinges countless times the doors finally open and close as they should. I can truly appreciate the phrase time is money. It took me six hours, and three store trips, to get both doors right.

Sometimes it is cheaper to call someone who knows what they are doing.:)
Case in point. Years ago I spent most of the day and 3 trips to Lowes, replacing some plumbing under the sink. It would have saved me $$ to call the plumber first.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
chrisn said:
Sometimes it is cheaper to call someone who knows what they are doing.:)
Case in point. Years ago I spent most of the day and 3 trips to Lowes, replacing some plumbing under the sink. It would have saved me $$ to call the plumber first.
HAAH it only cost 12 buck so it was mostly time.
 
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