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DIY Homeowner
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Discussion Starter #1
I did a red color on bottom of my dining room and a light tan for the top. The top came out great, covered it with two coats, but only needed one. The bottom with the Valspar "tomato red" not so much. I'm on my third coat and it doesn't seem to be even or covering as good as the other paint.
The tomato red is Valspar's "signature color" line in eggshell at $30/gal.
The tan was Valspar's "ultra Premium" line in eggshell at $23/gal. It looks like it's going to take five coats of the red. I used white primer for both.
Anybody have suggestions...or just keep speading the paint.
Thanks
Barry
 

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Remodeling Contractor
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3,590 Posts
Using a quality paint paint with a tinted primer (gray for red) would have only needed two coats. But with cheap paints their weakness shines with jobs like this. Another reason pros do not use big box store paints. Either put on a quality paint or just keep adding coats.
 

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yes, use gray primer for red paint.

sounds like its too late for you this time. I bet you end up doing 5 to 6 coats. you could have probably hired a professional with the extra material you will have to buy.
 

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Yep...Gray primer!

I don't even let people out the door with a Red paint (or many other Neutral/Ultra-deep base colors...), unless they're getting a Gray primer as well!
Or, I'll ask them if their Painter will be using some!!

If they don't want to follow the advice, I don't sell them the paint.

We have no complaints because of this...

Faron
 

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paper hanger and painter
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Yep...Gray primer!
I don't even let people out the door with a Red paint (or many other Neutral/Ultra-deep base colors...), unless they're getting a Gray primer as well!
Or, I'll ask them if their Painter will be using some!!

If they don't want to follow the advice, I don't sell them the paint.

We have no complaints because of this...


You also do not sell junk paint:whistling2: that helps a lot:laughing:
 

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FYI, the problem with red paint is that red pigment does not hide very well; it's almost more of a tint than a solid pigment. So, if you underlay the paint with a grey primer, the gray does not show up as much as a white underlayment does. (Any coatings with just white and black pigment can hide well because those pigments are VERY opaque.)

SirWired
 

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The "weight" factor...

When discussing Reds/Burgundies, etc....
I sometimes have a customer pick up a Qt. of Magenta colorant.
Then, I have them pick up a Qt. of KX, the TI02 "White" colorant.

Their eyes get big, and I usually hear a little "oooff"!

Then I start telling them about the differences in the tint-bases; and how each step down (deeper base) gets more translucent (meaning LESS of the heavy TI02).
Increasing amount of White have to be left out so the colors can be more intense/brighter.
The tradeoff obviously is sheer colors that need the help of a colored backdrop (primer) that'll cut the background reflection of a white surface thru a sheer color/tint-base.

Grays work well 95% of the time because...
Gray reduces the amount of light reflected. Simple as that!

Faron
 
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