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Paint sequence

1305 Views 53 Replies 13 Participants Last post by  jeffnc
I'm painting a section of the ceiling (flat white) and a section of the wall (yellow).

Should I paint the ceiling first or the wall first?

Is there a proper sequence?

Is it easier to tape off the ceiling or wall?
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Ok, I will have to buy one of those angle brushes.
Don't do it, your setting yourself up for some extreme frustration.

I get that some pros can paint an edge after years of experience but if you want laser straight edges get a Sure Line paint edger. With just a little practice you will get great results. I've used for 30 years and can edge a room in minuets, first time, perfectly straight and level.
Rectangle Liquid Font Plastic Magenta
 

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I too start w/the ceiling. I also put ceiling paint a bit down on the wall, maybe 1".

I am not a pro. I am unable to cut a straight paint line to save my life.
A big PLUS-1 on the Shur-Line.
Tip... keep the rollers outta the paint.

Good luck...Don.
 

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You cant trust those sure-lines.
Why not, I have several of them and they work perfectly.

Some tips.

1, you only use the top 1 1/2" of the pad to paint with then paint the wall rolling into the edged color.
2, as noted keep the paint off the rollers.
3, do sweeps just below the top corner then move up to where the rollers contact the ceiling.
4, I like to keep my gap from the ceiling a bit more than where the pad sits on the handle, slide the pad down and add a piece of tape, it will be secure.
 

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Should I paint the ceiling first or the wall first?
Paint the ceiling first.

Is it easier to tape off the ceiling or wall?
Oh gosh, we don't want to have any tape involved here.

When you paint a line, such as between a ceiling and a wall, you don't need to get a clean line twice. You can paint the first line sloppy, and the next line clean. So paint your ceiling going around the perimeter with a brush, and then paint the rest of the ceiling with a roller. You can be sloppy with the brush work, i.e. you'll be getting white paint on the walls.

Now, with a good brush and holding the brush correctly and using good technique (it doesn't take hours and years of practice), you can get a clean line on the wall.

I would not use such as stuff brush as shown above - it will be easier with a somewhat less stiff one. But Purdy and Wooster both make fine brushes that are available everywhere.
 

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If those pads worked well and fast, then pros would use them. No pro in the world uses them, so there's a reason.

One reason - I've never seen a perfectly constructed house. There are always minor (or major) glitches in the framing, drywall, and finishing. A brush allows you to "perfectly" paint a "straight" line on an imperfect surface, following the contour the best way.

Again, it takes a little technique that can be learned from watching a video, not years of practice.
 

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IDK, maybe they should! I just painted our pantry this morning, 6x14, cut in the ceiling in around 10 min each coat. As usual the lines are razor sharp and perfectly straight.

Dont tell me this tool doesnt work! It's perfection!
Brown Rectangle Wood Beige Tints and shades
 

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Dont tell me this tool doesnt work! It's perfection!
That actually looks pretty bad to me, unless there's some kind of optical illusion. There's too much of a gap between the wall and ceiling, and the gap also shrinks from right to left. Even if the gap is constant, I don't think it's a good look.

And we haven't even talked about how the thing gets messy, roller wheels get clogged, etc. Yes it "works", no it's not perfection because as I said above, walls and ceilings are rarely perfect, so you don't want something that can't adjust or adapt to the situations you'll see.
 

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It's the distortion trying to take a picture along a narrow room.

I get it, you want do diss a simple tool, too much gap, well, as noted above I move the pad down slightly to allow a larger gap, I'll take that vs paint crammed up into the corner or on the ceiling if you feel that is preferable! I like something that is straight, true and perfect!

And there is a lot of adjustability, your selling the tool short!
 

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To much gap, I guess I'll take that vs paint crammed up into the corner and onto the ceiling that you feel is preferable! I like something that is straight and true!
That's a false choice, you can paint just fine without a gap and without cramming. Lots of paints who learn the right technique are able to paint straight lines, or should I say lines that perfectly follow ceiling, or any edge for that matter.

And there is a lot of adjustability, your selling the tool short!
There is none. It has wheels and it goes on one track only. There is a lot this thing can't do, including follow an old line that isn't perfect, assuming you aren't going to paint the ceiling again on repaints (which is the case 90% of the time.)
 

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It has wheels and it goes on one track only
Not really, if you would take the time to read, maybe learn there is adjustment in the pad but as noted your just trying to diss a tool that provides a clean way to cut in a ceiling/wall paint line.

You ignoring the intent of this forum/post, we are not talking about someone who has years of practice, we're talking about the average DIY who wants to paint their own room, for that application, there is nothing better out there to do the job.

Get off the high horse and do what is good for the person looking for help!
 

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Not really, if you would take the time to read, maybe learn there is adjustment in the pad
The point is about adjustment as you go. If you adjust the spacing of the pad, it only works on perfect surfaces, of which there are virtually none. A hand brush allows that flexibility on the fly.


You ignoring the intent of this forum/post, we are not talking about someone who has years of practice
And has been told to you multiple times, it does not takes years of practice, only the right brush, the right way to hold it, and to be shown the right technique. It takes less time to learn the proper technique than it does to go and buy that gadget.

Perhaps it's time you started listening to the people who have way more experience than you.
 
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