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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Ive started by painting the entire door with a peanut butter color. I then separated all columns with masking tape. I used a straight edge to separate the squares from the rows and painted the top squares with darker brown, To see finished product preview I painted the column and row surrounding one square with bean color. It does not look like wood to me. I need to fix this. My thoughts are to obtain thinner and wipe remaining squares with darker brown thinned to create grain look.
What do you propose for me to do at this point?
 

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It's a tricky thing to do let me tell you. The colors have to be just right (base as well as top) and, in most cases, your graining technique must be stellar. There's dozens of ways to create grain from rocking tools to special brushes........to using special glazes topcoated with exterior grade clear coats. I would recommend going to pinterest or youtube to check out which look and the technique it takes to achieve that look. Like I said, there's just too many ways to do it and explaining it all on here without really knowing what you're after would be like taking a shot in the dark. Pics of what you want and what you have so far would help.
 

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Practice, practice, practice. Gymschu offered some good advise. Go to youtube.com, although I’ve never seen anything there that amazes me, however it gives you a place to start. Get a piece of sheetrock and begin experimenting with your technique. You’ll make mistakes, but that’s part of the learning process. Experiment with gel stains, apply using cheese cloth. Work the sun. This is not a week-end project, take your time. Once you’ve found your technique, don’t forget to seal it with and exterior varnish for protection.
 

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What to do now that I've already started?
You may have to start over. Maybe prime it all with a bonding primer to get back to a starting point. Then you may have to go with another color base coat, etc. Invest in some color samples from your local paint store so you can experiment like spraygunn said.

If you're lucky enough to have a great local paintstore, they may have someone knowledgeable on staff or they may know a local faux painter who can steer you in the right direction.
 

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truejazz, click on the link below my name on the left that says "View spraygunn's Album", you'll see many garage doors that I have done. They take time to do as well as learning.
 
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