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Hello Forum,

I've been performing a renovation on my house, and I'm preparing for the paint phase. I intent to paint everything - ceiling, walls, window and door trim (MDF and FJ Pine) and the inside of my front and back door (solid wood).

I've been using either my graco airless or my HVLP setup to prime everything with Kilz latex (walls/ceiling) and Duralaq acrylic undercoating, and will be spraying my paint as well.

What paint sheen is everybody using for the interior?

I intend to use flat for my ceiling - but have no idea what finishes to use for the walls, trim and doors. I'm reading some conflicting information online and wanted to ask the forum.

Any feedback would be appreciated.
 

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We use a lot of matte on walls. If you get a good quality matte, they are somewhat washable. Enough to be able to wipe off fingerprints and minor scuffs without damaging the film, and not so shiny as to be unattractive or highlight flaws.

Usually semi gloss for trim. Some people like satin better, or occasionally gloss, but semi gloss is the norm in this area.


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Yeah, each part of the country is different. JayMays uses matte, here in the Midwest it's satin, eggshell, or Low-lustre for walls, flat on ceilings. Almost always Semi-gloss on doors and trim.
 

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Sorry guys. I didn't know this was regional.

I'm in Atlanta, GA.
And, it doesn't really matter too much other than there's a certain "look" or preference in different areas of the U.S. Some homeowners abide by the unofficial preferences, others do not. Personally, I like Satin on walls. The higher grade paints are washable although very few people I've ever worked for wash their walls regularly. Since spraying produces a more glass-like appearance to paint as opposed to stipple that comes from rolling, you may want to go with an eggshell or low-lustre in case the drywall work is less than stellar. Any bumps, humps, defects will telegraph through your paint finish if it has a high sheen to it.
 

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Sorry guys. I didn't know this was regional.

I'm in Atlanta, GA.

With regard to sheen and color: I'm in Atlanta as well and am at the VERY BEGINNING of a major remodel on a foreclosure we were able to purchase. I also have several painting questions that I'm researching - some of the answers to your questions have been helpful!!!

I've done some research by going to model homes in the area, and found that MANY of them are using what looks like a step down in sheen from semi-gloss. I looks really "rich" and when I touched it, it seems like it would stand up to cleaning. I'm a complete novice, but even I can tell that it was a very high quality paint. And from reading posts from knowledgeable folks on this forum - you get what you pay for.

Maybe this is also regional, but I've also found that designers aren't using a bright white for trim and interior doors, but rather something with more depth (that would go with warm or cool wall colors). It's no where as dark as cream, and not necessarily an off-white, but it's definitely NOT white and is really beautiful imo. I plan to try and find the color and brand when it's time to do our trim and interior doors.

The very best of luck to you!
 

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Yeah, each part of the country is different. JayMays uses matte, here in the Midwest it's satin, eggshell, or Low-lustre for walls, flat on ceilings. Almost always Semi-gloss on doors and trim.
I replied to this thread with what I've noticed in the ATL area. I've noticed many model homes with trim and interior doors in a sheen that seems to be a step below semi-gloss. It's obviously a very high quality paint, and seems like it would clean up well. (They have also gone away from a bright white, and gone to something with more depth - not really a cream, but definitely not white.)

Are you able to let me know what the sheen I'm seeing might be, and possibly recommend a brand to cover these sticky, 20 year old latex painted doors and trim? (We're just starting a major remodel on a foreclosure that still has builder-everything.) Thanks so much~
 

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Tackiness on a paint film is a sure sign of the cheap fillers used in builder's grade paint. Fillers like clay tend to act like that especially in a humid climate.

Sand it to remove the gloss and hopefully most of the tackiness. Wash off the dust with a warm water and a rag, allow to dry, and then apply a quality bonding primer like Zinsser's 123. Allow that to dry for at least 24 hours. Then apply a quality trim paint like SW's ProClassic waterborne. It levels nicely to a glass like finish. It takes at least 30 days for it to harden up and cure properly, but, once it does, it will last a long time. You can get it in a satin finish if you don't want a shiny look that semi-gloss gives you.
 

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Sheen is really a personal choice as to what you like, I agree with Shu, I like satin on the walls and hate flat for anything but the ceiling. There are advantages and disadvantages to each. Flat will hide flaws in the prep better, but is not washable and always looks dull like it needs to be painted (my opinion). Matte is a step up in washability but not by much, the hiding flaws is about the same. Anyway as you go up in sheen the flaws show more and it becomes more scrubbable. This factor could be important if you have small children.

To me satin is in the middle but you do need to up your prep. It used to be the norm for kitchens and baths was semi gloss. But now every kitchen and bath has an exhaust fan, and we don't cook with grease and lard anymore so we don't need the scrub ability we used to.
 
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