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Hi,

I'm looking to purchase some spray paint. I want the spray paint for painting plastics, metals, and occasionally wood.

For now let's say i just want to spray paint in one colour.

What type of spray paint should i use?
Just paint?
Individual cans of paint and primer?
Or a can with the combination of paint with primer?


I get the impression that primer isn't always used? Is this true? And if so, under what circumstances should primer be used?



Thanks
Bob
 

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If these are just small items, you can buy spray in the cans. There is Fusion for plastic. Regular spray cans for metal and wood. Spray cans range in price from 4 - 8 dollars. Normally don't need primer for these applications unless there is rust on the metal.
 

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I've had real good results with Rustoleum's 2X, paint and primer in one, whatever that means. It covers well, sprays well, and dries quickly. Sometimes they run it on sale at Home Depot for $3.50/can. Regular price is around $5.
Mike Hawkins
 

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I get the impression that primer isn't always used? Is this true? And if so, under what circumstances should primer be used?
As the old saying goes ---- "if all else fails, follow the instructions".

Frequently, you are not actually painting over wood, metal or plastic, you are actually painting over paint. You normally won't have to put primer over paint. On wood, you frequently will be scraping off old paint that did not adhere ----here you only need to prime the bare wood. Paint has a hard time sticking to galvanized (zinc coated) steel --- you pretty much will always need a special primer for galvanized steel. But, just read the instructions on the can, if it says you need a primer for your particular application, use a primer.
 

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Painting is easy .... it's the preparation that takes work!

It matters WHAT you are painting. No 'recipe' fits every material. Let's look at each step of the task ....

The paint you use depends on what the paint will be exposed to. You're not going to use the same paint for your ceiling as you will use for the handle of your garden rake.

Paint needs something to 'stick' to. That's part of a primers' job. Naturally, things need to be CLEAN first - no oil, no soap residue, no trapped moisture to get between the primer and the material.

There are different primers for different materials. There's even a solvent-based primer for preparing plastic. In each case, read the directions!

One thing primers DON'T do is 'paint' things. Don't be surprised if the primer fails to conceal the look of what's under it. That's what paint is for.

There's no such thing a "spray paint." There ARE different things sold in spray cans. Depending on your task, you might want an 'appliance enamel,' a 'lacquer,' or an 'epoxy' coating. Read the label!

Finally, cover the item with many, many very light coats, almost 'dustings' of the paint. Then let it dry long enough to CURE- not just to be dry to the touch.
 

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My favorite brand of paint is Montana Black. Works great on a multitude of surfaces; Canvas, wood, stone, metal & glass. A bit spendy but worth it! And did I mention the awesome range of colors : )

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There are many types of plastic. Some are paintable. Some are not.

Wood can be a black hole for spray paint. Especially outdoors. It'll work, but you need to buy it by the case if you want to get proper coverage. Spray paint in cans is very thin to make it sprayable.

Spraying metal works pretty well if there are no coatings or oils.
 
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