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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The condensate drain pipe has broken off of my AC unit.

1. What would be the correct way to repair this? It looks like it has been secured by some sort of caulking (which seems incorrect to me). What parts would I need to buy to make an appropriate connection and how would I secure it?

2. Also, because the AC is up on some blocks, the weight of the PVC pipe is too much for that single connection point. My idea would be to support it by putting some bricks underneath it. Any better ideas? Thanks so much.



 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the response. I'm going to see if I can insert a new male adapter to see if the threads hold. Do you know what the "gunk" is that is on the male adapter? Seems like the "gunk" was put there because it needed extra adhesion. Of course, now it seems like the unit might have to be opened up because of this as it may have worn away the threads on the female side.

Does this male to female connection typically have any adhesive or is it just screwed in?
 

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Your pictures are bit close in (tightly framed) to understand what you mean by being up on blocks. If I did not know better I might think your photo was of an exterior wall. That fitting looks like the one I was just struggling with: https://www.diychatroom.com/f17/removing-p-trap-between-evaporator-ac-condensation-line-692913/

I am speculating, but it looks like that pipe was damaged by someone or something running into it (see alternate/better explanation below). Even if there was no support the PVC pipe should not be so heavy that it suddenly break in apart years later. I think the caulking was just to help prevent drips/leaking, that someone decided to add it as they were caulking up that vertical seam.

I am a newbie to your situation, but learned a lot during my recent project. To fix I think you will need to either a) use the hacksaw blade method to cut/score the PVC which was left behind when the pipe broke off. To remove the section which still remains before installing a new coupling. or b) get some of those ez-outs/nipple-extractors designed for irrigation systems, something that will work for thicker walled PVC pipe instead of metal pipes.

Also I learned after the fact (I have not verified this) that the PVC screw fittings are tapered, so if it is over tightened it will bind and crack. I suspect that is what happened in my house and in your situation. That whoever overtightened/cracked the fitting, tried to fix it with caulk instead of replacing the fitting. Which is now your job to fix. :devil3:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the link. I tried screwing in a few male adapter, but did not have any luck as the threads on the metal female side seems corroded. What did you have the best luck cleaning the threads with?
 

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Thanks for the link. I tried screwing in a few male adapter, but did not have any luck as the threads on the metal female side seems corroded. What did you have the best luck cleaning the threads with?
I think @ZTMAN suggestion would be the best, which is to use your drill with a small wire brush wheel to try to remove the top layer of rust. I only used some oven cleaner and manually scrubbed using a wire brush. I am not sure it made a big difference but maybe it was enough to get me over the hump. Also when I inserted the second fitting (after the threads on the first one got damaged/cross-threaded) I concentrated on putting a little extra down force (perpendicular force) as I screwed in the new fitting by hand. Then tightened a little more using a crescent wrench, but one must be very careful not to over tighten. I think using some extra down force to help avoid from camming out is key.
 
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