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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Didn’t plan on painting this door in the heat of summer. I’m guessing current dark brown paint is original & 39 years old.

It got chalky an I decided to scrub it last weekend with brush and used the garden hose with nozzle. To my surprise, since it didn’t look like it was peeling but it did. Years ago I had saved notes on how to do this but don’t know where they are.

Someone said scour it with one of those green kitchen scrubber pads so here’s my plan.

I’ll use a pressure washer on the door maybe this weekend then go over it with that green scouring pad and a little dawn detergent then rinse & dry.

A magnet sticks so it’s steel not aluminum (right)?

A painter commented he didn’t care for latex outside. I use SW paint so what is a good oil base exterior paint?

I’m going lighter with a light tan/ beige color. Do I need an exterior primer first since it’s splotchy white and dark brown now?

when I painted my interior 10 yrs ago I did 2 coats. Will 2 coats on this door will be better than one coat?
Brown Wood Shade Brickwork Brick
 

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Didn’t plan on painting this door in the heat of summer. I’m guessing current dark brown paint is original & 39 years old.

It got chalky an I decided to scrub it last weekend with brush and used the garden hose with nozzle. To my surprise, since it didn’t look like it was peeling but it did. Years ago I had saved notes on how to do this but don’t know where they are.

Someone said scour it with one of those green kitchen scrubber pads so here’s my plan.

I’ll use a pressure washer on the door maybe this weekend then go over it with that green scouring pad and a little dawn detergent then rinse & dry.

A magnet sticks so it’s steel not aluminum (right)?

A painters commented he didn’t care for latex outside. I use SW paint so what is a good oil base exterior paint?

I’m going a little lighter with a medium brown (tan). Do I need an exterior primer first since it’s splotchy white and dark brown now?
View attachment 704735
Priming is always good.

You choice of color is not. Dark color will increase the temperature in the garage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I can’t Figure out why all the flakes of brown paint that came off….. on the backside why are they white? Could there have been a white primer on the white door originally and that is whats peeling off along with the brown paint???
White Wood Sculpture Brick Creative arts
 

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First of all, that door is in great shape for it's age.
I would prime it and spray it.
A good quality electric sprayer would do a great job.
But of course you have to mask.....but I think you would be happy with the results.
Oil based would probably give you a better finish....but a hassle for cleanup.
I would choose a Rustoleum type paint to spray......just my opinion.
And you can get those in water base.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
First of all, that door is in great shape for it's age.
I would prime it and spray it.
A good quality electric sprayer would do a great job.
But of course you have to mask.....but I think you would be happy with the results.
Oil based would probably give you a better finish....but a hassle for cleanup.
I would choose a Rustoleum type paint to spray......just my opinion.
And you can get those in water base.
I’ve never used a sprayer before. I had planned on a small mohair roller and angled brush.

I just looked at sprayers and they’re expensive. I should have bought one when I bought this house but this door should be my last project:
 

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Just because one painter likes oil base does not mean it is gospel. There are outstanding latex paints that, when properly applied over the right primer, will do a great job for you. I like SW paint myself but a lot of what I like about it is that locally I have a SW store with a very experienced coatings guy in charge who freely gives good advice. Beware listening to the high school kid in the paint department at the big box.
 

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Should have included this but responded top quick and did not see the comment about sprayers.

"I just looked at sprayers and they’re expensive. I should have bought one when I bought this house but this door should be my last project: "

Rent rent rent!!! You will be glad you did - and the rental store will show you how to use it. A little experience with it will help you get a good result. paint something else first like a picnic table or dog house to figure out the nuance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Should have included this but responded top quick and did not see the comment about sprayers.

"I just looked at sprayers and they’re expensive. I should have bought one when I bought this house but this door should be my last project: "

Rent rent rent!!! You will be glad you did - and the rental store will show you how to use it. A little experience with it will help you get a good result. paint something else first like a picnic table or dog house to figure out the nuance.
We have a good rental place. I’ll ask. I got a workout painting both sides of a board on board 90’ fence.
 

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When I moved to central fla 45 yrs ago I was a firm believer in oil base coatings. It didn't take me long to figure out the intense fla sun did not like oil. Latex will last a LOT longer exposed to the fla sun! Some metal door manufactures advise against oil base paint and many will void the warranty it used. The reason for this is thin metal and expanding/contracting during temp changes. Latex paint is somewhat flexible, oil base is not.

I'd recommend a good cleaning and 1-2 coats of a decent latex house paint.
If there is any bare steel I'd spot prime those areas with a solvent based primer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
When I moved to central fla 45 yrs ago I was a firm believer in oil base coatings. It didn't take me long to figure out the intense fla sun did not like oil. Latex will last a LOT longer exposed to the fla sun! Some metal door manufactures advise against oil base paint and many will void the warranty it used. The reason for this is thin metal and expanding/contracting during temp changes. Latex paint is somewhat flexible, oil base is not.

I'd recommend a good cleaning and 1-2 coats of a decent latex house paint.
If there is any bare steel I'd spot prime those areas with a solvent based primer.
That was my main concern-type of paint. What do you recommend and since this is a one time project I’m not concerned about the cost of the paint.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Just because one painter likes oil base does not mean it is gospel. There are outstanding latex paints that, when properly applied over the right primer, will do a great job for you. I like SW paint myself but a lot of what I like about it is that locally I have a SW store with a very experienced coatings guy in charge who freely gives good advice. Beware listening to the high school kid in the paint department at the big box.
We used to have a great manager at our SW store thankfully he was there when I painted my entire interior. Then he left to become a sales rep. That’s why I rely on advice here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Is Duration exterior latex a good choice? Or is Emerald? What about primer?
thanks.

I found this on the Internet maybe Emerald is better?

Purple Organism Water Rectangle Violet


Font Number Brand Rectangle Electric blue
Font Rectangle Number Parallel Brand

Emerald seems better but since this is Florida with high humidity I like that one feature of Duration the ‘moisture resistant technology.’
 

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Brown paint adhesion failed in spots. Maybe because it was used without the primer or not proper cleaning? Maybe latex was used, not acrylic, and very smooth steel door and factory primer/paint. I would test by trying to scrape brown paint off. As long as current film stays, even sanding to feather, then I would assume it's ok to paint over. I would sand the whole surface with #100 paper or so. Scruff pads aren't aggressive enough imo. I would hold off on power wash assuming it's better not to disturb the adhesion?
Not a painter and I still believe that paint needs a surface with teeth. I don't know how well current primer/paint sticks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Brown paint adhesion failed in spots. Maybe because it was used without the primer or not proper cleaning? Maybe latex was used, not acrylic, and very smooth steel door and factory primer/paint. I would test by trying to scrape brown paint off. As long as current film stays, even sanding to feather, then I would assume it's ok to paint over. I would sand the whole surface with #100 paper or so. Scruff pads aren't aggressive enough imo. I would hold off on power wash assuming it's better not to disturb the adhesion?
Not a painter and I still believe that paint needs a surface with teeth. I don't know how well current primer/paint sticks.
This door itself was manufactured with a definite embossed grain texture.

I saw one video where a painter used car wash to clean a garage door.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Now read Duration is softer and will collect dust which will cause the paint to break down if it’s not cleaned occasionally.

A hint I saw on YouTube the guy disconnected the overhead door with the pull rope and then put sawhorses underneath the door and brought it down to that level so he didn’t have to bend over to paint the bottom.
 
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