DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We bought a cultured marble vanity top w/o an overflow opening. To go with it, I bought a Moen faucet that came with a plastic drain that has 2 overflow holes in the drain threads above the rubber gasket. I should've bought a faucet with the proper drain but I simply didn't know.

I installed everything and noticed a leak above the rubber gasket. I tightened it some more and it still leaks water that comes out of the holes and runs down the threads. If those overflow holes weren't there it wouldn't leak. Besides even if it didn't leak, water and gunk would get trapped in the space between the gasket and the holes and start to smell I imagine.

Basically I was wondering if I should plug the holes with a combo of teflon tape on the threads and a bead of silicon in the hole through the inside of the drain?

I saw a video of someone putting putty above the gasket to seal it but again I don't want smelly water getting trapped in that space.

I went to Home Depot to look for a drain w/o overflow holes but they didn't have any. There were some online but they were a 3rd of the price of the faucet.
 

Attachments

·
Naildriver
Joined
·
16,998 Posts

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: Bondo

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,356 Posts
Sorry but Chandler48s' solution will not work. The vessel sink drain is designed to fit a vessel sink. Notice the seal that fits the flat of the under side of the vessel sink surface around the drain.


Check that you installed the black rubber gasket properly, bevel side up. Put a small bead of plumbers putty under the lip of the drain flange. That keeps water from leaking out of the sink when sink has water in it and the stopper is closed. Never heard of someone using plumbers putty on the black gasket.
So remove the drain and inspect, put back in place with black gasket bevel side up, Install drain flange with putty under the lip. Push black gasket up and tighten nut. That black rubber gasket is flexible enough to seal even if there is small imperfections in the drain opening.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sorry but Chandler48s' solution will not work. The vessel sink drain is designed to fit a vessel sink. Notice the seal that fits the flat of the under side of the vessel sink surface around the drain.


Check that you installed the black rubber gasket properly, bevel side up. Put a small bead of plumbers putty under the lip of the drain flange. That keeps water from leaking out of the sink when sink has water in it and the stopper is closed. Never heard of someone using plumbers putty on the black gasket.
So remove the drain and inspect, put back in place with black gasket bevel side up, Install drain flange with putty under the lip. Push black gasket up and tighten nut. That black rubber gasket is flexible enough to seal even if there is small imperfections in the drain opening.
Yeah, I don't think those vessel drains will work for me.

The rubber gasket is on right per the instructions with the smaller end up towards the sink like in the attached image. I did put putty on the top side between the top part of the drain and sink opening. It won't leak when I fill the sink with water but when I pop up the drain it starts leaking.

I hand tightened then I got some channel locks and tightened some more. I didn't want to overtighten as the threads and nut are plastic.

I'm calling Moen tomorrow to see what they suggest. Worst case I'm plugging them like I mentioned in my original post, f' it. What do you think is the worst case scenario I'll be facing?
 

Attachments

·
Naildriver
Joined
·
16,998 Posts
Harold, explain how installing a standard drain with overflow holes will work on a sink without an overflow feature.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,452 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: chandler48

·
MEASURE ONCE, CUT TWICE
Joined
·
4,538 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,356 Posts
You will probably have a hard time finding a drain assembly without an overflow. Remove your drain by holding the drain flange and unscrewing the drain assembly. Take note of the location of the drain gasket and the overflow holes. Gasket should be well below the overflow holes. If not, cut off enough of the top of the drain to make the holes in the side of the drain about 1/2" above the gasket below when tightened.


Look at the drawing, if the gasket is below the overflow drain holes the water will be blocked regardless of its source.


As implied in the drawing I suspect that the flaw is in the sink, not in the drain assembly as was my case. It just wasn't worth my time to return it, I have and have had a bathroom sink without an overflow for 30 years. I suspect the same in your case. I seldom close the drain. The purpose of the overflow hole is to prevent overflow if you forget to turn off the water.


The drain is plastic, easily cut and the threads are not precision ground threads. So either cut off the top of the drain or return the sink.


PS
Look in the interior walls of the sink drain opening and see if the drain lines were cast in the sink. Suspect they were. Suspect they are required. Just a screw up.
 

Attachments

·
A "Handy Husband"
Joined
·
14,117 Posts
Not that hard to find, the one in post 5 has no overflow.

Sent from my RCT6A03W13E using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,452 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You will probably have a hard time finding a drain assembly without an overflow. Remove your drain by holding the drain flange and unscrewing the drain assembly. Take note of the location of the drain gasket and the overflow holes. Gasket should be well below the overflow holes. If not, cut off enough of the top of the drain to make the holes in the side of the drain about 1/2" above the gasket below when tightened.


Look at the drawing, if the gasket is below the overflow drain holes the water will be blocked regardless of its source.


As implied in the drawing I suspect that the flaw is in the sink, not in the drain assembly as was my case. It just wasn't worth my time to return it, I have and have had a bathroom sink without an overflow for 30 years. I suspect the same in your case. I seldom close the drain. The purpose of the overflow hole is to prevent overflow if you forget to turn off the water.


The drain is plastic, easily cut and the threads are not precision ground threads. So either cut off the top of the drain or return the sink.


PS
Look in the interior walls of the sink drain opening and see if the drain lines were cast in the sink. Suspect they were. Suspect they are required. Just a screw up.
Yes, the holes are above the gasket. It seems water runs down the threads and past the rubber gasket. It very well might be an issue with the sink. Maybe it's not perfectly round and the gasket isn't able to seal correctly. I found a video that shows a drain, sink and issue very similar to mine.

https://youtu.be/NkWS8vnUA4s
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,356 Posts
.So much misinformation.




Just cut off 1/4 to 1/2" of the drain mechanism, reinstall as tight as you can by hand.

If you don't have much grip use adjustable pliers to tighten. Hand tight doesn't mean " like your wife would do it."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,023 Posts
Pro tip: if you're gonna cut the threaded portion of anything, put the nut (or whatever equivalent fastener) on the threaded portion before you cut. Then you can run the nut back off the threads, which will help clean up the threads at the cut so that it's easier to thread the nut back on after you cut.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top