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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking to figure out if there is some sort of equation I can use to figure out exactly how many outlets and lights I can have on the same breaker, online it says most lights pull about 60 watts but the box for the lights I have says 12 and I was just wondering if anyone can confirm this or am I reading it wrong because I’m adding 5 outlets and it says to account for about 1.5 amp per outlet so that’s 7.5 so that leaves me with 12.5 amps for lights, now google says about 120 watts per amp at 120(watts)x12.5(amps left) I should be able to add up to 125 lights on this circuit, I thought that seemed a little crazy but I figured there had to be someone in here who could tell me if I’m missing something or anything, thanks in advance!
 

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A receptacle adds nothing to the load. It is what gets plugged in that matters. The NEC does not have a limit for number on one circuit.

Lighting is based on the larest bulb that can be installed.
 

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You really don't want lighting outlets and receptacles on the same branch circuit if you can avoid it. Just as an example, you are standing in the bathroom drying your hair and the breaker trips. Now the light and the hairdryer are off and you are in the dark.

The NEC does not place a limit on residential receptacles on one branch circuit. However, in the commercial environment each receptacle is assigned a value of 180VA. So a typical dual receptacle would be counted as 360 VA
 

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Receeptavle load is all about intended use. In kitchens it can be a whole circuit for just 1 receptacle, but in a bedroom it may not use 3 amps for the entire room excluding ceiling fan/lights. Just remember the occasional load of a vaccum cleaner or a portable heater, etc.
 

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Lighting is based on the largest bulb that can be installed.
What is typically considered to be the largest bulb that can be installed on an E26 fixture ?

I could fit a 100 Watt or maybe 150 Watt bulb in there, but the only place I will find one of those bulbs is a museum.

17 Watts is about the biggest I will readily find in this day and age.
 

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What is typically considered to be the largest bulb that can be installed on an E26 fixture ?

I could fit a 100 Watt or maybe 150 Watt bulb in there, but the only place I will find one of those bulbs is a museum.

17 Watts is about the biggest I will readily find in this day and age.
The largest size bulb you can put in any given fixture is that which the fixture is rated for. Physical size has nothing to do with it.
 

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@SPS-1 That trick doesn't work, you can't say "I only need to provision 17W to this Edison screw-base fixture because I for one plan to use LEDs". You could sell the house to a cold-dead-hands type, and they'll put incandescents there. And yeah, they're still for sale if you make a bit of an effort, my sweetie insisted on them in 2 rooms so I obliged.

You don't have to provision for the largest bulb made in that base (e.g. 150-200W for Edison E26). But you do have to provision for the largest bulb the fixture is rated for: so if it has 3 Edison E26 sockets and labeled "60W max" then you must provision 180W.

And that ... is part of why many fixtures use new socket types such as Gu24, which are specifically designed to reject incandescent bulbs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
so
You really don't want lighting outlets and receptacles on the same branch circuit if you can avoid it. Just as an example, you are standing in the bathroom drying your hair and the breaker trips. Now the light and the hairdryer are off and you are in the dark.

The NEC does not place a limit on residential receptacles on one branch circuit. However, in the commercial environment each receptacle is assigned a value of 180VA. So a typical dual receptacle would be counted as 360 VA
Basically my issue is mainly that the previous owner did a very poor job at labeling the service panel and now I’m having issues figuring how out I’m going to fit all of the stuff I’m adding without having to have the panel completely redone it’s only 125 amps and it’s a double wide trailer but I didn’t think there was enough stuff in here for the panel to be full full so I was contemplating trying to tie into the original for some of this but my issue is there’s only 1 free breaker slot, if I could possibly reroute some simple things maybe the fridge and stove on same breaker or washer and fridge or maybe I could try to tie all of the outlets I’m adding into the original if anyone thinks that could work? Also it’s only a living room and the rest of the house seems to have the lights and outlets on same breakers already so if nothing else that’s my plan
 

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... my issue is mainly that the previous owner did a very poor job at labeling the service panel......
Electricians are trained in how to write useless breaker labels. I created a list to identify every outlet, light, and piece of equipment in my house and which breaker controls it. Laminated the list and I keep it beside the panel. Could come in handy one day when something is not working and i can't even figure out what breaker its on. Or at the very least, save me a lot of walking when I need to turn something off. You might want to do something like this just to get a better handle on what you have on each circuit.


Breaker Map.jpg
 

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I also bought a house where wiring wasn't labeled properly, could not make heads or tails of some of the small scribbles. Labels like "Upper Kitchen" "Washer wall" "Electrical Chair". "Washer wall" was actually the entire laundry room and several outlets on the opposite wall in the kitchen. Never could figure out "Electrical chair", which was the living room outlets.

Before moving in, all outlets and switches were replaced. Using a magic marker, I wrote the controlling circuit breaker number for each, on the inside of all the outlet and switch covers before installing.

Recently, when I wanted to replace the kitchen fan, I just removed the switch cover plate and read the circuit breaker number. I still used a circuit tester to confirm the circuit was dead before proceeding with the fan replacement. Can't be too safe when dealing with electrical.

Takes the guess work out of deciphering the electrical panel labeling.

Have a good day.
 

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You really don't want lighting outlets and receptacles on the same branch circuit if you can avoid it.
What about wiring at least one light or outlet in one room from the branch circuit of another room?

That way when you trip a breaker in the first room, you still have a way to get enough light to fix it.
 

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Electricians are trained in how to write useless breaker labels. I created a list to identify every outlet, light, and piece of equipment in my house and which breaker controls it. Laminated the list and I keep it beside the panel. Could come in handy one day when something is not working and i can't even figure out what breaker its on. Or at the very least, save me a lot of walking when I need to turn something off. You might want to do something like this just to get a better handle on what you have on each circuit.


View attachment 654696
If you wanted to pay the electrician for his time and laminating supplies, I'd bet most would be more than happy to do that for you. So far in my career I haven't had much trouble with panel directories except for installations where DIYers were involved.
 

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LED's changed things but old school "recommendations " was to count a light as 1 and a outlet as 2 and add it up to your breaker So 15 amp breaker 5 outlets ( 5 x2 ) 5 Lights (1 x 5) or 15 lights (1x15)
.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
LED's changed things but old school "recommendations " was to count a light as 1 and a outlet as 2 and add it up to your breaker So 15 amp breaker 5 outlets ( 5 x2 ) 5 Lights (1 x 5) or 15 lights (1x15)
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So google says about 120 watts per amp, my lights say 12 watts per light, now if I add 23 lights (I’ve already marked out where I want them and counted them) through the living room dining room and kitchen that’s 276 watts (by the math) call it 2.5-3 amps but that still leaves me with 17 amps so adding 5 outlets to that circuit shouldn’t be an issue, basically now I’m trying to decide if I should just tie into the electrical that’s already there and save the breaker I have so I can try to take another breaker out to put in a sub panel down the road for a shop, or down the road I just upgrade the system to 200 amp let me know your opinions! Thanks in advance
 

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I hate how my house is wired.. Everything they did was to save money.

Since installing solar, we have started to change over to electric heating and various other electric tasks.. but the house didn't have enough breakers.. I'm slowly working my way through and upgrading everything. Living room plugs should have their own breaker, bedroom 1 should all be on a breaker, bedroom 2 on its own breaker, etc..

And now I'm installing electric baseboard heaters, which basically require their own breaker.

There is a silver lining. I have picked up new skills as I have now mastered the task of fishing wires through existing walls.. and I'm getting really gooood at it..
 

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So google says about 120 watts per amp, my lights say 12 watts per light, now if I add 23 lights (I’ve already marked out where I want them and counted them) through the living room dining room and kitchen that’s 276 watts (by the math) call it 2.5-3 amps but that still leaves me with 17 amps so adding 5 outlets to that circuit shouldn’t be an issue, basically now I’m trying to decide if I should just tie into the electrical that’s already there and save the breaker I have so I can try to take another breaker out to put in a sub panel down the road for a shop, or down the road I just upgrade the system to 200 amp let me know your opinions! Thanks in advance
Yes you are correct, the old way was to think of a light as 100 watt, so yes you could have 50 in theory. My only point to think of what happens if a breaker does trip, you have all light on same circuit and whole room goes dark.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yes you are correct, the old way was to think of a light as 100 watt, so yes you could have 50 in theory. My only point to think of what happens if a breaker does trip, you have all light on same circuit and whole room goes dark.
So what do you think I should do? Just take out existing lights and replace on same electrical and should be okay? Or just go the safe route and add a breaker and add them to there own, also if I did that I decided it would only be the middle section of the house on the breaker I would probably just replace the lights in the bedrooms and just use the same electrical (unless someone gives a logical reason not to) I feel like it should be fine by the numbers
 
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