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Discussion Starter #1
I’m a basic DIY person when it comes to electric - changing fixtures, replacing switches With dimmers and adding an outlet or two. I’m in the Process of updating part of my kitchen And I wanted to add an outlet to bees over from where one is right now.

When I shut the Power off and took out the existing outlet from the box it shows that there is three wires Already connected to it (3 hot and 3 neutral). There is space for one more But I’m not sure if I’ll be overloading the outlet at that point. Is there anyway to really tell prior to connecting it to a newly installed outlet?

FYI Walls are partially open, 15amp is why we are dealing with. I have no problem referring this to a real electrician but wanted to see if I were able to handle this myself first. I attached a picture for preference

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have two port connectors or just using wire nuts? Pretty sure that’s what that means? If so, I’ve done it a few times in other spots.
 

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Naildriver
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Either method will suffice. You'll need to use 4 port connectors. However, your kitchen receptacles need to be on a 20 amp circuit (2 of them) and they both must be GFCI protected. Tell us about yours.;
 
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" I Can Fix It "
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Jason,


First I would check CODE to see how many devices are allowed on a small appliance circuit. Looks like you have a metal box Jason. (519) maybe. I would cut power, twist all the hots (blacks) add a piece of longish black (same gauge) strip 1 end, twist all blacks together, wire nut them off, wrap around screw w/clockwise hook,( looks like one of the loops is installed backwards) attach to brass colored screw& tighten. Repeat with whites (neutrals) on silver screw, and a ground twisted to existing w/bonding device (green nut w/center hole) or copper ground squeeze device. Install back in opening. On GFCI's of coarse.


just sayin :vs_cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies and I have a GFCI outlet that’s on the circuit about seven days away on an opposite wall - Would that suffice?

And would you take the box out piggy tail all three blacks with one coming into the metal box to make it easier same thing with the whites and then have a separate black-and-white going to a new outlet to bays over from that one?
 

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Kitchen receptacles in the USA are required to be on 20 amp circuits. Existing circuits are grandfathered, but if you start modifying the circuit you need to make it meet current codes.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Great thanks for the heads up. As for the piggy tailing, could I then take the three hots and put them to one new wire coming into the box? And then the new outlet would be on its own on the separate push in ports?
 

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Naildriver
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And, no you can't separate the hots and neutrals and send them through separate holes in a metal box. Each cable must remain intact and enter holes in the metal box. Your GFCI must be the first receptacle in the line and the remaining receptacles will be fed from the LINE side of the GFCI.
 
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Another thing you need to worry about is whether the additional conductors from adding a fourth cable to that box will cause you to exceed the box fill specs for size of the junction box you have.
 

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Should I just get a bigger metal box? Or go plastic 2 gauge?

I would first determine the size of the junction box that is there in terms of , width, height and depth. If it's a single gang box, you might find it is 2" x 3" x 2-1/2". Or maybe it'll be 3-1/2" deep rather than 2-1/2".


A larger box make things easier in terms of room to make all the connections and to push the wires back in the box. But a larger box may not be necessary, depending on what's there now.



Read up on how to calculate box fill, and you'll be able to determine what you need.



https://www.ecmweb.com/national-electrical-code/code-basics/article/20886012/box-fill-calculations
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for the reply. I’m assuming I need to make sure that the wires are brought into the box 1st and then pigtailed then correct?

I have Three separate items on this outlet so how would I pigtail? Can I put all three hearts in a four port connector and same with the neutrals? From there I can then add a new outlet And use the load connections - am I right on that?

Thanks for the help again
 

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That is correct Jason. All junctions MUST terminate in a box, and they MUST be accessible. The box fill research will help you get back on track.
 
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