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· Contractor/Engineer
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Just cut that end off and replace it. You can get cord ends at any home improvement or hardware store.
Don't waste your time following some of the suggestions about. Replace the end or buy a new cord. It really is that simple.
 

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As for buying new ends, there are different qualities and the best are NOT CHEAP. As for the lowest price ones many are junk.
As for the suggestions to slide the sheathing back where it belongs, that is a "no brainer" and at no cost.
Note, when someone cuts off either end of a cord they need to know which wires correspond to hot, neutral, and ground when connecting to the replacement plug which does not identify by color (usually).
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Just cut that end off and replace it. You can get cord ends at any home improvement or hardware store.
Don't waste your time following some of the suggestions about. Replace the end or buy a new cord. It really is that simple.
Actually it isn’t that simple when money is tight this month and a new cord was $60.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
As for buying new ends, there are different qualities and the best are NOT CHEAP. As for the lowest price ones many are junk.
As for the suggestions to slide the sheathing back where it belongs, that is a "no brainer" and at no cost.
Note, when someone cuts off either end of a cord they need to know which wires correspond to hot, neutral, and ground when connecting to the replacement plug which does not identify by color (usually).
I really didn’t know the sheathing could be slid back. Or that the end could be cut off and replaced. There’s always so much valuable advice on here. :)
 

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Until OSHA comes snooping on a jobsite. Not happy. At our local college, I had my cords with two rounds of blue tape on each end for identification. I had to remove them to prove they weren't repairs.
You probably could have argued that because according OSHA regulations repairs are allowed unless the equipment didn't met the requirements or depending on what they are being used for..
If the extension cord is being used for construction purpose the following applies

so long as the repair returns the cord to the "approved" state required by §1926.403(a). This section states, "All electrical conductors and equipment shall be approved." The repair of cords and cord sets is permitted under 1926.404(b)(1)(iii)(C)
 

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I had too much work to do without pickin' and grinnin' with OSHA.
I could understand avoiding that whole mess.. we usually don't win that argument unless we throw the book back at them...Sometimes after the grief I have put up with over the years, it's worth it to put their own words back at them.. Just thought I would give ya some info if they do it again someday down the road..Cheers 🙂
 

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Note, when someone cuts off either end of a cord they need to know which wires correspond to hot, neutral, and ground when connecting to the replacement plug which does not identify by color (usually).
The replacement plug has designated terminals on every single one sold. For this 120 volt plug it would be the same as any other device. Copper color (hot) Silver color (neutral) and green screw (ground). At least in my experience.
Even four conductor plugs are designated. So if you follow the designation you have no issues.

Actually it isn’t that simple when money is tight this month and a new cord was $60.
The cord end should be under $10. And that would be a good one. Leviton, Pass & Seymour and Hubble are a few good names in the industry.
All you have to do is cut off the end and install one. Amazon sells Leviton I think.
Trying to repair the existing cord is silly and will not hold up for long. Even if you can push the insulation back into the sleeve it will pull out easily. Just fix it, but a new one or use it like it is.
 

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When you strip back the casing from the wires, don't leave much more than 1" of wire showing, or you'll have the same pull out problem you have now with the molded one.
 
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· In a little over my head
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Replacing the end is easy. If that's the female end, treat yourself to the one with the light inside. Handy, for just a couple dollars more. I don't like the ones with the metal clamp with exposed screw ends. They work fine, but sooner or later you'll cut/scratch yourself.
 

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My expensive 12 gauge Ridgid cord did that. I carefully epoxied it. Worked for a while then somehow more wire was exposed. Epoxy cracked. Haven't bothered fixing it yet again. Cord is fine and safe. I don't use it outside in the rain though.
Ridgid cords have a lifetime warranty. Just go to Home Depot with it, they'll punch something into their computer, and give you a new one. You don't need the original receipt or any ID. I buy lots of Ridgid cords at garage sales for cheap that are beat up. I take it in and get a new one every time. No questions asked.
 

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Ridgid cords have a lifetime warranty. Just go to Home Depot with it, they'll punch something into their computer, and give you a new one. You don't need the original receipt or any ID. I buy lots of Ridgid cords at garage sales for cheap that are beat up. I take it in and get a new one every time. No questions asked.

I will have to try that! Maybe I should clean any remaining epoxy off, so they don't think I tampered with it. I'm on the road this week, but will take a picture of how bad it is ...
 
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