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Is this safe to use with my electric power washer? Outdoor cords are expensive. I hate to buy a new one but I’d hate more to electrocute myself. I’ve had this cord a long time and no I don’t know how this happened.
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Wondering if FlexSeal would work on things like that. I see the dredgers on Bering Sea Gold slather that on their suits to seal tears and leaks.
 

· Naildriver
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I would go ahead and change the receptacle on the end with one of these, OR a box with receptacles as mentioned by Eddie.

 

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Replacing the end with a NEMA 5-15 is your best bet... But no you won't get electrocuted unless the wire insulation on the individual wires are damaged, which doesn't seem to be your case.. you can use it a pinch but now it can be damaged much easier... Getting a end would be your safest option and cheaper than a new extension..
 

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Everyone above is correct...no argument ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ and I'll catch he11 for this...

But take electrical tape and tape that up thoroughly.... get both the sheath and the end of the plug...to protect it from further damage...and use it carefully... pull it off by the plug, not pulling on the cord.

(Honest speaking, some of my construction cords resemble a zebra.,,, and I'll bet I'm not the Lone Ranger))
 

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Before you cut anything, simply slide the outer sheathing back towards that plug end.
Tie the cord to a fence post or other secure point. I use a soapy wash cloth and grab the cord near where it is tied. Then slide your hand along the cord like you are cleaning it. Keep your eye on the plug end to see your progress. If none, squeeze a little harder and repeat.
Once the sheathing starts to move guide it to go into the plug. I use a 2 part epoxy but super glue would probably work to secure that sheathing to the neck of the plug.
The cause of this problem is pulling on the cord and not just the plug.

Bud
 

· Naildriver
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some of my construction cords resemble a zebra
Until OSHA comes snooping on a jobsite. Not happy. At our local college, I had my cords with two rounds of blue tape on each end for identification. I had to remove them to prove they weren't repairs.
 

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My expensive 12 gauge Ridgid cord did that. I carefully epoxied it. Worked for a while then somehow more wire was exposed. Epoxy cracked. Haven't bothered fixing it yet again. Cord is fine and safe. I don't use it outside in the rain though.
 

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Have someone (or thing) hold the opposite end's outer jacket and wires (gloves, vise, etc.) near the plug.

Then, starting at the end that is now fairly secure, pull you hand towards the end in your photo. The goal is to "lengthen" the outer jacket by coaxing it towards the short jacket end. You'll gain maybe 1/4" with each full length pull. Think of a tight pillow case where you slowly manage to get the case up over the innards. You'll get the 1/4" of slack, then have to coax that 1/4" further along by repeating the stroking/pulling action.

After a few tries you'll have excess outer jacket at the socket end (the one in your photo) and you can guide that excess into the recess of that molded socket.

Does this cure the problem? Not really. During construction, the inner wires are twisted with each other and then the jacket added, thus the twisted inner wires are simply acting like the threads of a bolt, causing the outer jacket to migrate along the length of the thread. So, during use, the cord is stretched, coiled, thrown about and otherwise abused which make the outer jacket conflict with the "thread" and it's trying to unscrew itself.

You can also change the socket (female end) as aptly advised by others - perhaps with a new end that has a very secure clamp to help hold the jacket and slow down the inevitable migration down the "thread twists".
 
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But take electrical tape and tape that up thoroughly.... get both the sheath and the end of the plug...to protect it from further damage...and use it carefully... pull it off by the plug, not pulling on the cord.
Should the tape be wrapped clockwise or counterclockwise? Do you use the left hand rule, or the right hand rule?
Hand Gesture Finger Thumb Font
 

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Is this safe to use with my electric power washer? Outdoor cords are expensive. I hate to buy a new one but I’d hate more to electrocute myself. I’ve had this cord a long time and no I don’t know how this happened.
First off it should be plugged into an GFCI outlet. To make it safe no matter what condition the cord is in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Have someone (or thing) hold the opposite end's outer jacket and wires (gloves, vise, etc.) near the plug.

Then, starting at the end that is now fairly secure, pull you hand towards the end in your photo. The goal is to "lengthen" the outer jacket by coaxing it towards the short jacket end. You'll gain maybe 1/4" with each full length pull. Think of a tight pillow case where you slowly manage to get the case up over the innards. You'll get the 1/4" of slack, then have to coax that 1/4" further along by repeating the stroking/pulling action.

After a few tries you'll have excess outer jacket at the socket end (the one in your photo) and you can guide that excess into the recess of that molded socket.

Does this cure the problem? Not really. During construction, the inner wires are twisted with each other and then the jacket added, thus the twisted inner wires are simply acting like the threads of a bolt, causing the outer jacket to migrate along the length of the thread. So, during use, the cord is stretched, coiled, thrown about and otherwise abused which make the outer jacket conflict with the "thread" and it's trying to unscrew itself.

You can also change the socket (female end) as aptly advised by others - perhaps with a new end that has a very secure clamp to help hold the jacket and slow down the inevitable migration down the "thread twists".
Now I understand how this probably happened. I’ve always known not to unplug anything by yanking on the cord. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Everyone above is correct...no argument ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ and I'll catch he11 for this...

But take electrical tape and tape that up thoroughly.... get both the sheath and the end of the plug...to protect it from further damage...and use it carefully... pull it off by the plug, not pulling on the cord.

(Honest speaking, some of my construction cords resemble a zebra.,,, and I'll bet I'm not the Lone Ranger))
I probably use more tape than anyone for small patches with duct tape but I have plenty of black electrical tape. My kids used to have a pet rabbit. When bunnys see a cord they think it’s a tree root they need to chew through.
 

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Until OSHA comes snooping on a jobsite. Not happy. At our local college, I had my cords with two rounds of blue tape on each end for identification. I had to remove them to prove they weren't repairs.
I have witnessed OSHA rejecting extension cords, too. Sometimes cords with replaced ends. Home use is not regulated by OSHA so the suggested repairs can help.
 
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