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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All,

I have a post that supports our wrap around deck that is out of plumb by a 1/4" in one direction and approx 1/8" in the other direction. The other major issue is the lack of connection at the base.

Background: House is 16 years old, we are the third owners, and we are situated in middle TN. The house is generally in good condition.

In the attached pictures you can see where I recently replaced a garage door into the basement (must be a southern thing) with a properly build wall. The span there is 16' from the post in question to the right side. There are five 2x12's supporting this span. On the left side of the picture the span between posts is 8' with two 2x12's forming the beam.

Unfortunately when they connected the support posts to the beams they toe nailed and faced nailed everything together instead of notching the tops of the posts and/or using metal brackets. I know that it's not code, at least in today's scenario.

I'm thinking that I could add another 6"x6" post in the middle of the 16' span, properly anchored at the top and bottom for additional support.

As for the out of plumb post, I'm thinking of sistering a 2x6 to each side, anchoring them to the slab and using proper brackets at the top to tie into the beams.

Removing and replacing this post now seems like a big job given the way it's connected at the moment. I'm aware that there are joist hangers that should have been used too, I will address that as well.

The beams on both sides of this post are level and there is no sign of sagging.



Not necessarily trying to solve a problem (it's been here for 16 years like this). I'm bothered that it wasn't done right to begin with, and I would like to improve it.

So what are the thoughts on this idea?

Thanks,
Lou
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retired framer
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You will have to try the pictures again.
See below , go advanced and then find manage attachments,
 

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I wouldn't put much effort in correcting this plumb problem because from the appearance of the underside the whole thing only looks to have another 10 years life possibly remaining. The part that's really scary is how it was attached to the building. Being this must be a southern thing you have an estimated 10 years to locate a yankee to do it right.
 

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retired framer
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I wouldn't put much effort in correcting this plumb problem because from the appearance of the underside the whole thing only looks to have another 10 years life possibly remaining. The part that's really scary is how it was attached to the building. Being this must be a southern thing you have an estimated 10 years to locate a yankee to do it right.
Are you seeing pictures. If you are can you copy and paste them in a new post.
 

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retired framer
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You could add a 2x6 on both sides to better support the beams.

 

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retired framer
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You could add another post, I doubt if it needs it other than for what the sag looks like.

If you want to jack it up, do it slowly over a week or two so the wood has a change to bend with out pulling everything apart. I would suspect the posts have footings and you would be taking a chance when adding another on the slab.
 

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Hammered Thumb
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Aaah, the out of plumb is in the post itself, not from settling somewhere or something. I imagine (well hope) that bent post is not from buckling as those toenailed connections would have given way first.

Your wrap sounds fine for visual, but I don't know if 2x's and worrying about the brackets is necessary considering you'd just be resting on the slab, which probably has no pier or thickened footing under it. And you may or may not be supporting the roof (can't tell if the same 8' or so side overhang is on the back) so unless you want to redo it all right just visually band-aid it with 1x's til another day when it rots or you see signs of failure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Re: Out of Plumb Post (Long) Bowed Post

Sorry about the pictures - I re-posted then below.

I should have also described the problem better: the post is bowed in the center which is causing the out of plumb issue.



I suspect the bow is caused by the post drying after they installed it. There's no sign of the nails pulling away from the beam. The wood looks to be in decent shape with the usual checking that I assume occurs upon drying.


Not sure how the post is anchored to the slab. I tried sliding a putty knife in the gap, but it's hard to say if there's something there or if it's just sitting on the slab.

What would be the best way to anchor the top and bottom of the new sistered 2x6s?

Hard to imaging having to replace every post in ten years :surprise:
Thanks...
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retired framer
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I think you have have a base under the post.

When you attach 2x6 you can try to straighten the post but there is no guarantee that it would work.

Start the 2x6s at the top flush to one side and when you get half way down put a jack between house and 2x6s and push them to straighten the post.

All you joists need hangers, HDG ones with HDG nails and while you are there just look around for something that you could tie the beam to the post with.

The decking above will stop it from coming apart even with out being tied properly.
 

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1/4 “ out of plumb May or may not be an issue that needs fixing. If you are out a quarter over a 4’ level gauged from ground up, that kind of translates to a bit more over the entire length of those posts, like maybe half inch.....which won’t make the deck fall down...but if it is out from left to right when looking straight in at the door it will be noticible.
 

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When decks fail people usually die. Having the post out of plumb should be at the bottom of your list of concerns. I would get steel plates and use hot dipped galvanized bolts and nuts and washers to fix the connections of the beam and support posts. I would also add knee bracing between the posts and the deck. I would assume that the ledge connection to the house was also not done properly and buy some of the Simpson Strong-tie connectors or add Hot Dip galvanized lag screws.

I would give some thought to adding side brackets to the bottoms of the posts and securing them in place. Worst case I would use another post and a jack to support the beam at the present post and then remove the post.
There are many companies selling products for attaching wood posts to contrete slabs and you should be able to adapt one to your situation. Look for decking connector companies online.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Calson,

Thanks for the reply. I'm not sure what you mean when you mention a knee bracing and what the benefit would be?

I plan on adding connectors at the base of the posts to the slab, and some kind of connection at the top of the post to the beam.

Lou
 

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Hammered Thumb
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I believe Calson is talking about this kind of bracing.
2715b1430c147e6ef4776c0bec9fd333.jpg

It also sure looks like there is sag across that 16'.
loum.jpg

Regardless, the bend in the post can be visually covered. Then I would start getting my ducks in a row by evaluating, designing, and saving some $$ to redo the whole darn deck and footings in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for the clarification on the cross bracing. There's no sag in the 16' span, I think it's just the picture.

Replacing the whole deck is a bit extreme, I think. I will definitely do some remediation and repair to make it better.

Lou
 
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