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Discussion Starter · #21 · (Edited)
I have exactly 4 1/2" at the door threshhold. Then the concrete slopes down away from the house.

I figured I would use a 4x2 flat on the ground right up against the house as the first joist, then work away from the house shimming as I go. The shims should mean water can drain under the deck away from the house.

Roughly following the ideas in this article:

http://www.familyhandyman.com/patio/how-to-build-a-deck-over-a-concrete-patio/step-by-step

At the threshold I'll have whatever the thickness of the waterproofing is (say 1/2" max), then a 4x2 flat (that's 1 3/4") plus 5/4" decking, so about 3 1/2" total?
 

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I have exactly 4 1/2" at the door threshhold. Then the concrete slopes down away from the house.

I figured I would use a 4x2 flat on the ground right up against the house as the first joist, then work away from the house shimming as I go. The shims should mean water can drain under the deck away from the house.



At the threshold I'll have whatever the thickness of the waterproofing is (say 1/2" max), then a 4x2 flat (that's 1 3/4") plus 5/4" decking, so about 3 1/2" total?

that is exactly what i was thinking. but use that plastic wood (wth is that called again ?) for the shimming. but idk just how that EPDM stuff will hold up with a lot of weight concentrated in one spot. just how hard is that stuff ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
It's a good question - that's why I fancy the liquid rubber. If it fails, it only fails in one spot (bad for a roof, not a disaster for a yard). If I use a rubber sheet and it fails, I could end up with water pooling and collecting between the rubber and the concrete.
 

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i wouldn't be worried about pooling, as i would about the rubber cracking and letting water get past it and into the basement. but like you said, it doesn't need to be "water proof", just water resistant.
 

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It will have to be carried through the house a piece at a time! Far from ideal, but a lot less messy than bucketing 5 tons of broken up concrete out through the house, then figuring out how to pour a new slab. Then I've got to carry the decking through the house anyway! Some pictures below. As you can see the yard butts right up to the house and both next door fences:



Getting the broken concrete out is the hard part, pouring new concrete is the easy part, just run a pump line through the house .
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Well, either way, I don't have the time or skills to break up and repour the concrete myself, and the estimates I got are all at the high end of 4 figures, so it's a non-starter I'm afraid.
 

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How long have you lived there? Long enough to know neighbors?

If you have this problem its likely your neighbors have dealt with it also. Hiw have they handled it?
 
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