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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We currently have a door at the top of our stairs on main floor that leads to the basement. Since the basement is in the process of being finished (and will be accessed far more often once completed) we are thinking that it would be better to remove that door and open up a portion under the stairs.

Currently with door its a little awkward since a 90 deg open door will block access to main floor powder room/garage entry/ laundry room (it does swing to 180 deg though). Also, we would see benefit of it feeling much more open in that portion as we have a somewhat narrow hallway (38") there. So we see many positives.

One hesitation may be that it would then be open to a main traffic way that isnt too wide (42" from nose of top stair to the wall in hallway)and not sure if that could be considered a partial safety concern based on where it is? And maybe there is something else layout wise we are neglecting and would regret later?

As far as the construction goes, the doorway isnt bearing any load as there are 2x 2x10's spanning the load across (as seen in image)

Your thoughts and opinions are appreciated!
 

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retired framer
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Go stand on the stairs and take a picture of the framing. It does look good by the plan.
 

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The only potential concern i would have would be if there might be a stud on the corner that needs to stay. Probably is not. Looks like a good idea and it will really open up the area.

whoops ... just looked at the floor plan. Triple 2x10 header, looks like it bears only on the ends. So now my concern would be if there s a stud next to the door hinges that needs to stay ... again probably not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The only potential concern i would have would be if there might be a stud on the corner that needs to stay. Probably is not. Looks like a good idea and it will really open up the area.

whoops ... just looked at the floor plan. Triple 2x10 header, looks like it bears only on the ends. So now my concern would be if there s a stud next to the door hinges that needs to stay ... again probably not.
Thanks for reply. Here is a pic looking at framing around the door hinge side. You can see 2 of the 3 2x10s bearing on the 2x4 wall. Looks like there are probably 4 - 2x4s vertical that take the point load
 

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I think that corner post want to stay there which would be okay and give a good anchor for the 1/2 wall or rail and stiles - Nealtw -->> what do you see?
 

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retired framer
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Thanks for reply. Here is a picture looking at the framing.
I have not seen the metal stair cheaters before, it does look like they have a 2x10 or? something there for strength and the other side they have used the wall.
So anything else can go but you still have work in a ceiling over the stairs.
648877
 

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retired framer
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I would start with a 2x6 screwed to the studs just below the 2x10 that is there.
1617851897744.png
Add a matching one on the other side, cafe bull to make them level
Cut away the wall just below the new 2x6.
Add 2x4s on flat between the new 2x6s for the ceiling in the stair case. 24" on center.
1617852484911.png
Add blocking between studs.
1617852636681.png
 

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Thanks for reply. Here is a pic looking at framing around the door hinge side. You can see 2 of the 3 2x10s bearing on the 2x4 wall. Looks like there are probably 4 - 2x4s vertical that take the point load
Looks like one is a cripple, from the door header up to the beam, so its not carrying any load. The king stud next to it was probably just for the door framing, so bottom line it looks like the whole wall with the door can be removed.
 

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Don't forget the Law of Unintended Consequences.

Talk to your HVAC people about your plan; they might need to make some changes.

Removing that door will require a smoke alarm on the upper "landing". And it will have to be "connected" to all the other smoke alarms. An excellent time to replace all the smoke alarms, choosing a brand/model that can mix wired and wireless. And set a reminder in your phone for April 2031 to replace all the smoke alarms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Don't forget the Law of Unintended Consequences.

Talk to your HVAC people about your plan; they might need to make some changes.

Removing that door will require a smoke alarm on the upper "landing". And it will have to be "connected" to all the other smoke alarms. An excellent time to replace all the smoke alarms, choosing a brand/model that can mix wired and wireless. And set a reminder in your phone for April 2031 to replace all the smoke alarms.
thanks for the insight, had already talked to hvac about that possibilty, and factored in adding a return duct at bottom of stairs regardless. As far as smoke alarm, there already is one very close by already (see image)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I would start with a 2x6 screwed to the studs just below the 2x10 that is there.
View attachment 648881
Add a matching one on the other side, cafe bull to make them level
Cut away the wall just below the new 2x6.
Add 2x4s on flat between the new 2x6s for the ceiling in the stair case. 24" on center.
View attachment 648882
Add blocking between studs.
View attachment 648883
I think i'm following. i had done the same thing basically on the lower portion of stairs with cutting drywall, then studs with skill saw and then adding the blocking. I look at this as doing the same thing upside down...
 

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retired framer
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I think i'm following. i had done the same thing basically on the lower portion of stairs with cutting drywall, then studs with skill saw and then adding the blocking. I look at this as doing the same thing upside down...
Yes.
 

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As far as smoke alarm, there already is one very close by already (see image)
👍
If you don't know when your smoke alarms were last replaced, it's time to replace them. The cost of all new smoke alarms is negligible. Particularly when compared to the possible cost of a single failure. After all, we are talking Life Safety. 😊
 
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