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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a new topic from an old problem.

I have a 12ft long load bearing wall, that already has an opening of about 6ft to the westside. I would like to open the whole wall up, either with a 12 ft long headbeam, or leaving the middle post, and have two 6 feet long opening on each side. That means, I need to support 2 posts, either with 12 ft apart or 6 ft apart.

This is a 100 year old building with reno throughout the century. Floor joist are about 3x10, spacing 30inches out. They were not put in exactly on the dot 100 years ago, so I can't determine where the joists under my floor is based on what I see in my ceilings.

I can't access downstairs, so i have to dig under my floor, correct?

I would like to hear your guy's advice.

Do I open up my paquet flooring and dig a big enough of a hole to access to the underneath to add joist for my new posts?

If I am digging up the flooring, the paquet floor would never look the same correct?

If I am leaving the middle post, the floors in that area will be covered by kitchen cabinets and counters, so no big deal; if I want to open up 12 ft, at the very right end, the floor will be in the middle of all sights... Can parquet floor ever look right after I dig a big hole and then cover it?

Thanks Building Fixture Wood Flooring House
 

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retired framer
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Do you know the difference between balloon and platform framing?
100 years old I would suspect it is balloon and there is no floor under the wall but the studs go right to the basement.
So what does the bottom of the wall look like. this might work in your favour.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
just looked at Balloon framing, this is a 3 storey building, balloon framing for the whole building?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I guess my hesitation is,

would one be able to restore parquet flooring after tearing it out for the 12ft opening, Is there any tricks that one should follow in preperation of future restoration of the parquet floor?

or,

should I just dig up what would be underneath the kitchen cabinets, and deal with the double 6ft openings with a post in the middle of the kitchen counter...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have not started opening up the flooring yet. I am trying to think of an cautious, effective way....
 

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retired framer
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I have not started opening up the flooring yet. I am trying to think of an cautious, effective way....
You have open walls can you see down between them or not?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I opened interior walls. I cannot see down between the studs. In face, the bottom studs of the walls are all indented, below the level of the subfloors... see pic Wood Floor Brickwork Brick Composite material
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Anyone? Would I be able to cut off a part of Parquet floor and sub floor and add joists for my post, then restore it in the middle of the main hall? Or is restoring Parquet floor is pretty much impossible so I better only open up floors that would be covered in kitchen cabinets?

Thanks!
 

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retired framer
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I opened interior walls. I cannot see down between the studs. In face, the bottom studs of the walls are all indented, below the level of the subfloors... see pic View attachment 659644
I was thinking maybe you could cut the studs some ways below the floor and put some sort of beam down there to spread the load on all all the studs.
But that would mean you would have open more floor so you could attach the beam to the studs.
If you are interested in that we could explore the idea.
I have never seen parquet repaired so i can't help with that.
 

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Naildriver
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If you disturb the parquet flooring it will be toast. It is tongue and grooved to where it won't come apart easily. Now, with that out of the way. Why can't you access underneath. Or is it that you don't want to go down there with all the dragons :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
These are small parquet floors that don't have tongue and grouves. I have some spare pieces of them. They are all loosen pieces, I guess until you glue them down. They are pieces of 4"by 1/2" small wooden strips, but put together in 1'x1' fashion and ready to be all glued down. I am thinking I should move this post to the Flooring section ?
 

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The photo parquet looks like average clear finish floor. Parquet floor i know comes in sheets like mosaic tile, and outside edges have tongue and groove although individual pieces don't. If you lift off one sheet, you may see wires holding the pieces together. They are glued down. If you remove some, you should commit to refinishing the whole floor, unless you are willing to live with some difference. Maybe that might be ok since I don't think you're talking about heavy traffic area. Thick wood floor glue may set to tolerate light traffic and allow you to make it level with existing flooring. Maybe they are white oak. I had very light oak floor. Light to begin with but sanding and finishing with water based urethane made it lighter. You may have to search and have plenty of it ready before you remove the old.

To clear my own confusion, load bearing posts for beams must rest on matched footings, not usually on joists.
 

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Naildriver
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I am thinking I should move this post to the Flooring section ?
No, please don't. We are already on a roll on this thread, and we read them all, anyway, so reposting it would only add to confusion. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This is the spare parquet floor that don't have tongue and groove. Does that mean it can be re laid after opening up? Brown Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain

I am commting to refinish the whole floor anyways. I want to make it lighter of a color.

My concern is, would the patched area be obvious.

If I go for option 2 where I need to re lay the parquet floor, the patches will be in very obvious area and very heavy traffic: middle of the hall way between kithcn and living area...
 

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I never sanded parquet flooring. I said commit to refinishing but now thinking maybe harder than the strip floors. That is because the pieces don't go in one grain direction. Sanding across the grain will leave more sanding marks and that means more sanding with smaller decreasing paper grit sizes. There must be youtube videos. If must sand, my guess only, maybe easier to use paint stripper to remove the urethane then use orbital sander which doesn't sand as aggressively but able to sand across different grain directions.

I never saw parquet pieces held together with mesh. Must be newer kind. I think I am seeing that mesh doesn't hold the pieces as securely. So as you glue them down, you probably need to make sure the pieces are tight together as well as the whole sheet is square and square to adjoining pieces. You may have to use wood filler for any small gaps. I said use floor glue to level but if replacement is already level, using recommended amount of glue will be fine with even heavy traffic area. Probably replacement will be thicker, if the original was sanded. If thicker, you can always sand the top down about 1/32, esp along the edges and try gluing down one sheet. If that works, even with the rest, than you just will need to sand the replacement 1/32.

That flooring, I think, is maple, not oak. Maple is usually uniform across all manufacturers. Compare it to the flooring you have. Sun and time may have changed the floor and new replacement can look lighter but you could try very light stain or use as such and let the time blend them. Water base urethane leaves lighter color. Not sure if the replacements are already finished. Already noted above, replacement probably will not disappear.

Try other forums also. There is a forum for wood flooring pros. Johnbridges.com is for ceramic tile pros but floor is a floor. May get better answers.
 
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