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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need some guidance that I can't find a real answer to. Recently (started late 2017) heavily remodeled our home and it now includes 2 separate laundry areas that were known to all to be equipped with high efficiency washers and gas dryers. No provision for electric dryers was to be installed. All electrical is new and installed by a licensed electrician and inspected as required. The burning problem is that each area was only equipped with one dedicated 15 amp duplex outlet. This does not sit right with me. If the electrician knew, should the areas not be serviced with a 20 amp circuit? Is this even enough?Should this have passed inspection in Ontario? Gas dryer manual says plug into a 15 amp circuit. Washer only says a protected outlet. The main section of the home's laundry room set-up was/is very obvious. 14/2 is all that runs to both. Nervous now that a tough re-wire has to be implemented to the main area. The other, well easier, will not be simple. Not bashing, but this particular individual will never be employed by me or any agents I use ever again.
 

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Depending on their power (amperes) requirements, a gas dryer and a washing machine may be plugged into the same 15 amp branch circuit.
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You might not be able to use a clothes iron or hair dryer at the same time the washing machine or dryer was running.

Additional receptacles may be installed in the laundry area, fed by other branch circuits not dedicated or exclusive for specific rooms or purposes.
 

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Have you tried to see if it works? If it does not support the load, you have to do something. If it works, forget about it
 

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Canada sounds like they need to beef up their minimum requirements. Unfortunately lots of contractors will not go 1 step over the absolute least they are forced to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Old Thomas-It works, but is it correct? I believe not. Sure, its ok if you run one machine at a time, but who does that? I think Wiredindallas is correct saying the minimum code needs attention. And that is what this lazy guy was all about-minimum code, even tho I asked for but did not receive most of the "upgrades" I inquired about. Anything I did get was met with a lot of whining. I will never not have it done "my way" ever again. Thanx for the reply.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Amen. This guy was all about minimum even tho I asked for more. I have a 3 bay garage, 12 feet high. I was to get 4 outlets total. I have at least 10 because that is what I asked for and he whined at that. And he balked at a 220 outlet, And balked at 20 amp outlets. I paid for his services thru a "contractor" so it wasn't like he was doing it for free. Fired that contractor eventually. Now I have to do both myself.

Canada sounds like they need to beef up their minimum requirements. Unfortunately lots of contractors will not go 1 step over the absolute least they are forced to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
But who waits for the dryer to be done before starting a 2nd load of wash? I'm running a 2nd circuit to ease my mind.

Depending on their power (amperes) requirements, a gas dryer and a washing machine may be plugged into the same 15 amp branch circuit.
'
You might not be able to use a clothes iron or hair dryer at the same time the washing machine or dryer was running.

Additional receptacles may be installed in the laundry area, fed by other branch circuits not dedicated or exclusive for specific rooms or purposes.
 

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You said it works and then you said you don’t want to run one machine at a time. I define one at a time as not working. Running another circuit to ease your mind, does that mean it works or it doesn’t work?
I don’t blame the contractor or think he is lazy if he met minimum requirements prescribed by the code. If he had priced the job higher to cover the expense of more circuits, the job would go to another guy who does the minimum required. Any contractor does what code requires unless you specify and are willing to pay for more.
If your code requires more than what you got, complain to the inspection agency and electrician. In that case you paid for something you didn’t get.
 

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Keep in mind also that a gas dryer does not use much power. It is likely a 15 amp circuit will run your washer and dryer at same time.
 

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Whether our current Code meets everyone's desires, there seems to be a desire to beat on the contractor. Unless it was specified otherwise, electrical work would be done to the existing Code, which is the standard he has to satisfy. Could he have suggested an upgrade? Perhaps, then you would have had the option to decide.

The fact that some codes now call for greater protection in circuit capacity, protection, etc. does not mean that houses with grandfathered codes are bursting into flames across the land. Our house, like I suspect many, many others, has a 15A laundry room circuit with nary a problem running both the washer and gas dryer at the same time.
 

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It is not unusual for a city to have its own code, for example (hypothetical) the Hamilton Electric Code being a brochure with locally published pages that refer to the CEC for most provisions and having various sections and paragraphs of its own.

Did you order additional circuits and work and write that into the contract, or did you just inquire about that?
 

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Electrical code on Ontario is provincial. There are no local codes except what the local POCO might set for meter locations and connections.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanx to all that replied. I accept options that all should suffice. Exposed to two fellas in the line of work over the last while. The first was too far from me to do my job but his suggestions and attention to detail as well as making suggestions ruined me for the guy at my job. I understand code. I understand that it is minimum that most work with. BUT way too may of my requirements were shot down for my liking. To plug in my vehicle in the cold means I had to throw a cord under the door of the heated garage. Is this acceptable? Yes, to some but not me. i hate cords.
Because of him not heeding to one of my requests, I realized much too late that I have no outlets outside of my triple garage doors and the closest to were I park is 30 feet away. All brickwork now installed makes adding them difficult.
 

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Did you (the op) read my response in post #2?
Seems you're too busy being disgruntled to communicate effectively.
That could well be the root of the problem between yourself and the
contractor too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I thought comment #14 covered it all. I did find the minimum codes you stated. Thank you for the specific numbers. Could not find them. But when a moron like me reads all over that I should be connecting both machines to a 20 amp circuit, I'm thinking the worst. I won't rant here anymore. Want more on my situation, PM me. I'd be glad to chat.


Did you (the op) read my response in post #2?
Seems you're too busy being disgruntled to communicate effectively.
That could well be the root of the problem between yourself and the
contractor too.
 

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I thought comment #14 covered it all. I did find the minimum codes you stated. Thank you for the specific numbers. Could not find them. But when a moron like me reads all over that I should be connecting both machines to a 20 amp circuit, I'm thinking the worst. I won't rant here anymore. Want more on my situation, PM me. I'd be glad to chat.

Your shooting the messenger (your electrician). You have a GC, he is the one calling the shots with the electrician (and any other tradesmen there). The electrician did a code compliant install, if you requested 'over and above code' ie, extra circuits or receptacles, you need to take it up with the GC.


The electrician 'bid' on a job spec'd by the GC. If he does extra, it's on his own dime unless the GC approves the change.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Well, no. I did not have a GC. He was very insistent on point that after I fired him. I, according to him, was the GC. Ask my lawyer. Ya, maybe he bid. Whatever. But I lived on site when he was here. I politely asked for things over and above code with all expectation and assurance that I will pay the extra expense that I now have to do at likely twice the cost. How stupid is it that if I pop a breaker in the garage that I have to climb 19 carpeted stairs and go thru living areas to get to the sub panel when said sub panel was requested in said garage? My "GC's" primary trade was plumbing. Muffed that too! Sorry I brought it up.

Your shooting the messenger (your electrician). You have a GC, he is the one calling the shots with the electrician (and any other tradesmen there). The electrician did a code compliant install, if you requested 'over and above code' ie, extra circuits or receptacles, you need to take it up with the GC.


The electrician 'bid' on a job spec'd by the GC. If he does extra, it's on his own dime unless the GC approves the change.
 

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OK, sorry, I thought you were mad at the electrician. I guess it's the plumber ... I don't blame you, I don't like them either :biggrin2:
 

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If you requested additions or modifications there should have been a change order stating the change and it’s price, signed by you and the contractor. Without that, it is all just hot air.
 
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