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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I’m considering removing a section of my interior kitchen wall to achieve an “open concept” space.

The wall is approximately 10 feet long, 8 feet high, 2”x4”x16”OC construction, with a single bottom plate and double top plate. There is one door opening in the wall. I’m looking for some code clarification and code references for what I plan to do, so please help me out.

I want to open the wall up so that there is approximate a 7’6” opening (the door opening would be part of this opening). I want to have a lintel/header that is two-ply 2”x8” SPF lumber tight against/below the double top plate that spans the opening with jack and king studs (similar to this photo attached). My walls are 2”x4” construction so I only have room for 2-ply lintel/header. Note that this wall is on the main floor with a stickframed roof with collar ties above and basement below.


Questions
1) In order for my lintel span to be code compliant do I have to follow the Ontario Building Code 9.23 Table A-15?
2) What is the difference between 9.23 Table A-12 and Table A-15?
3) Since the jack studs (and likely the king studs) will be distributing the load to the floor what section of the code defines how it does that? For instance what if the studs transmitting the load are located right between two floor joists? Can I add blocking in between and where is that defined?

Thanks!
 

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If the wall in question is in the picture, that is not a load bearing wall. If it is not, it helps to have a picture of the wall in question.
 

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That second photo does nothing. You need to show it as it is, in what you showed in the first photo.

It appears that you have already done some reframing, with possibly changing out the existing header that was there before.
 

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both walls in that second photo have double top plates. the wall with the door opening has a header thats only a double 2x4 which was a standard method in the 40`s -50`s even if the wall wasnt a bearing wall.. what you need to do is determine which direction the ceiling joists are running to know if its a bearing wall or not
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Photo of My Wall Proposal

Attached is what currently exists (not modified yet) and also attached is what I want to do with the wall. The wall in question is the one on the right.

My initial questions were as follows:

I want to open the wall up so that there is approximate a 7’6” opening (the door opening would be part of this opening). I want to have a lintel/header that is two-ply 2”x8” SPF lumber tight against/below the double top plate that spans the opening with jack and king studs (similar to this photo attached). My walls are 2”x4” construction so I only have room for 2-ply lintel/header. Note that this wall is on the main floor with a stickframed roof with collar ties above and basement below.


Questions
1) In order for my lintel span to be code compliant do I have to follow the Ontario Building Code 9.23 Table A-15?
2) What is the difference between 9.23 Table A-12 and Table A-15?
3) Since the jack studs (and likely the king studs) will be distributing the load to the floor what section of the code defines how it does that? For instance what if the studs transmitting the load are located right between two floor joists? Can I add blocking in between and where is that defined?
 

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Surely the wall to the left meets code in your area. Why not duplicate the header assembly to the wall on the right.?
So even if the wall on the right is not load bearing, you will just have one beefed up wall.
Git er done.........................
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Both walls (definitely the one i question) are loading bearing. This is based on the walls and joists below and the ceiling joists above.

The wall to the right will have a larger span than the one on the left, by about a foot. Just wondering if somebody can address my questions.

Thanks again.
 

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Only one wall is possibly load bearing. As long as there is not a floor above that one in the picture. With you already making modifications to the structure. You have now caused issues and walked 40 steps backwards.
 

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if the wall you want to modify is a bearing wall you will need more than a 2ply 2x8 header for that span. i would upgrade to a 2 ply lvl for the header. the other thing is you will create more pressure on the floor system below if your dont transfer the loads properly to the floor system below via squash blocks
 

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The wall to the right will have a larger span than the one on the left, by about a foot. Just wondering if somebody can address my questions.

Thanks again.
Questions 1 and 2: Can you post a link to the referenced tables? The answer to your question is probably in the long list of footnotes below the span tables.

Question 3: Again, this depends on the the code in Ontario. In the California building code, I would reference 2308.4 Supporting Bearing Partitions: Bearing partitions parallel to joists shall be supported on beams, girders, doubled joists, walls or other bearing partitions. Bearing partitions perpendicular to to joists shall not be offset from supporting girders, walls or partitions more than the joist depth unless such joists are of sufficient size to carry the additional load.

I doubt you will find the authority in the building code to transfer the loads from your header to your foundation by simply using blocking between the floor joists. In most basic instances, blocking would be standard, but it really is at the discretion of the building department. They may ask you to add blocking and then double the floor joists. They may ask you to install a beam under joists to transfer the load to your foundation...you won't know until you get your permit. At the MINIMUM, you should at least plan for blocking between the floor joists under your header.
 

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the original poster will have to factor into the beam size snow load on the roof which may be transfereed down to the floor system depending on the roof layout and upper walls
 
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