DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks, hoping you can provide some wisdom.

I have a junction box with a single pole light switch connecting to a ceiling fan in a bathroom.

My junction box has only a single wire feed coming in (1xblack, 1xwhite, 1xground). Power comes from source to fan, then switch leg to light switch. My timer has Black, White, Red, Green (and red/yellow which is not needed for this installation). I'm not sure how to connect this to make the timer work?

I'm trying to figure out what i connect to my black (hot) wire and to my white wire (neutral). Greens a no brainer :)

Suggestions to make this work? I thought of just connecting black to black and white to white, but wans't sure the timer would work without the red connected?

Insight would be appreciated.

thanks
Allen
 

·
Naildriver
Joined
·
18,593 Posts
Your white wire is not a "neutral", but part of the switch loop. Technically it is a "black" wire. Post a picture of the timer so we can see what you see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
From what you've written, and based on my limited experience with similar timing circuits, you need a true neutral at the switch box. I'd guess you have 14/2 run from the light to the switch. If you replace the 14/2 with 14/3, you will have the spare conductor needed.
 

·
Naildriver
Joined
·
18,593 Posts
Ouch, 1940's. You don't have the required neutral for that switch. While you are at it, replace the adjacent switch, as it probably has seen better days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Planning on replacing the other switch too. Alternatively. Since i have 2 switches in this junction box. i could steal power supply from the black from the other switch as it is constant hot. If i do this, and connect to the black on the timer, then i would have a black and a white that lead to my fan that i could use for the leg: red on timer to black in box to black on fan, white on timer to white in box to white in fan. the white can connect to the white from the original power source in the fan as i have a power wire at the fan from original source. I would then just cap off the black hot wire from source in fan? thoughts?
 

·
Naildriver
Joined
·
18,593 Posts
In all probability you don't have a "hot" at the other switch, as it is also most likely a switch loop. Check to see, and if you do, it may be possible to relocate the white wire in the switch loop to the neutral in the light. Be aware the hot from the source may be your white wire. Needs checking, too.
 

·
A "Handy Husband"
Joined
·
14,370 Posts
You need to find a timer that does not does not require a neutral (because you don't have one).
 
  • Like
Reactions: joe-nwt

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
In all probability you don't have a "hot" at the other switch, as it is also most likely a switch loop. Check to see, and if you do, it may be possible to relocate the white wire in the switch loop to the neutral in the light. Be aware the hot from the source may be your white wire. Needs checking, too.
thanks larry. the power source for the other switch is the same power source for the switch i'm working on. it's just that it feeds the junction box from the actual light and fan respectively. The power to the light switch is constant hot in the junction box. I would have to disconnect the power feed (black) to the fan (at the fan) and cap it off, but i could tie back into the circuit using the white that joins back into the white that feeds the light switch and original power source.

here is what i'm proposing
Rectangle Slope Font Line Parallel
 

·
A "Handy Husband"
Joined
·
14,370 Posts
Your proposed solution is a code violation. All conductors of a circuit must be in the same cable sheath.

Sent from my Lenovo TB-X606F using Tapatalk
 
  • Like
Reactions: joe-nwt

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,841 Posts
That code requirement, RJ, brings up another practice that is/was common. That is the practice of running the 2 travelers only between 3 way switches and getting the neutral from another location to go to the light. The arc fault requirement finally "put that practice to bed."
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top