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Discussion Starter #1
Howdy to all,

I have a maybe 30 some year old electric furnace and I want to change my thermostat to one that can automatically switch between heat and a/c as the season changes or the temperature dictates.

Unfortunately, I won't be able to get into the room that has the thermostat until mid September - long story. But, I want to buy the thermostat now so that i'll have it when I get the opportunity to change thermostats.

I would appreciate it very much if I could receive recommendations on either a new model, or brand of, thermostat to buy. I'm retired, so price is a consideration.

Also, I'm assuming that I'll be able to use the current wiring to my present thermostat to connect to the new thermostat. Correct? Or do some of the new thermostats have different connectivity requirements.

In other words, can I just disconnect the old thermostat, use that wiring to connect to the new one and be done with it?
 

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Most of the better stats now feature auto-changeover. that's the feature you need.

anything honeywell.

do not use auto-changeover mode when the outdoor temperature drops below around 60, can cause compressor damage unless the outdoor unit is specifically set up for low ambient operation.
 

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"anything honeywell."
->meant honeywell is a good brand, not that all honeywells have auto-changeover. you have to check the specs.
 

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I would not recommend any auto changeover feature unless you have a low ambiant temp cutoff control in your outdoor unit set at 50 deg F.

If you don't and you run it under 50 deg f it has no load to work against and could freeze/ice up your indoor cooling coil and then damage the freon compressor.

Auto changeover is more for restaurants and commercial bldgs with roof top units.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My thanks to both user 12345a and Yuri. That's good money saving advice - if I decide to install this type of thermostat. I thought that would be a good idea, but now I'm not so sure. I'm going to ponder that decision a bit and check to see if I can adjust the cutoff control or not.

There was no comment made about the wiring so I'm going to assume I can re-use the cable that goes to my current setup.

I'm going to stand by and see if more wisdom or recommendations come my way.

Thanks again guys.
 

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Auto-Changeover thermostats are an example of things that don't work under most circumstances, especially residential where personal perceptions are involved.

We installed those in quite a few commercial applications (restaurants and offices) where the owners had the juice to decide what would be proper. We always used Accustats with sensers based on written specs from the owner or franshisee to ensure that close tolerances were possible so that it could work as well as could be expected.

Accustats have a locking cover that takes a special tool to release in order to discouraged tampering by unathorized individuals. Of course some of the more ingenious ones found that placing a hot damp rag on the housing would provide cooling beyond what the owner wanted to.

To counter that, we placed them in the return air ducts immediately behind the ceiling register, which was a hinged unit to allow service techs access but to keep other hands off.

My recommendation: don't install one in your home and expect to like it.

It was never popular with those working in those places. :plain:
 

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auto-change over is only useful when heating and cooling are required the same day - for example a meeting room in the winter can need heat overnight/in the morning but cooling during business hours.

If your house needs heating and cooling the same day, it probably has zero insulation in it.

low ambient control and compressor crank-case heater are used on the a/c for applications that require cooling in cold weather. (in this case, it's better to just cool with 100% outdoor air)
 
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Howdy to all,

I have a maybe 30 some year old electric furnace
Replace the electric furnace with a heat pump.
The money you will save on electric will pay for the heat pump in short time.
And yes, I know that wasn't your question.
 

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^depends on the climate, not worth it if it's brutally cold or on the other extreme heat is required a couple of weeks each year.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks surferdude2, Missouri Bound, 57Tinkerman, and 12345a (again).

The last time I got a price on a heat pump it was around 6k. That didn't stop me from considering it. My experience with them is that it's difficult to feel warm in the winter. I've heard that's 'no longer true' but I'm doubtful.

What reminded me to start thinking about changing my thermostat type is what the weather is today here in northern Virginia. Right now, the temp is about 73 or 74 but the sun has only been out for at most 1 hour today. I'm cold. This condition doesn't happen 'often' but I'd estimate it happens perhaps 15 or so days/year. Right now, as I said in my initial post, I can't get to my thermostat to turn up the 'volume'.

Makes me think of one of my pet peeves. Updated windows are supposed to pay for themselves in a 'relatively short period of time'. BS. I've seen no change in my electric bills since they were installed and neither did my brother (Richmond Va.)

Maybe I've gotten too old and too skeptical but I think not.

Thanks again fellers.
 

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Buy a oil filled radiator type heater from HDepot.

They are 100% efficient and have 3 settings. 500/1000/1500 watts.

I have one in my living room and use it all Winter. Saves wear and tear on the furnace and is real comfy.
 

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Heatpumps have gotten better, but they still put out much cooler air than furnaces -> 85 to 100F supply air depending on the outdoor temperature. Furnaces modern, more like 110 to 120F.

The run times/cycles are much longer which isn't a bad thing.

When the registers are small relative to the amount of airflow, heatpump heat can feel drafty. Supplemental electric heat required in cold weather, like 20 to 40F.

Still, it makes sense to get a heatpump over an a/c when there's no natural gas available. Could save 30 to 60% on heating costs.

There's a new generation of heatpump that can maintain full capacity down to like 0F outside, but pricey and loaded with electronics.


What reminded me to start thinking about changing my thermostat type is what the weather is today here in northern Virginia. Right now, the temp is about 73 or 74 but the sun has only been out for at most 1 hour today. I'm cold. This condition doesn't happen 'often' but I'd estimate it happens perhaps 15 or so days/year.
Heat in august? Open the windows and bring some warm 74 degree air in. Wear a sweater.
 
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