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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I moved and mounted a closet door in the kitchen. I'd like to know how crazy it would be (for a non-pro like myself) to remove, or cut out?, the five rectangles so that I can mount glass in their place. In fact, what I'd like to understand is whether those are actual panels with molding, or if it is the door carved out. If the panels were inserted and then held in place like a regular window, then I would "simply" remove the molding around each rectangle...
[Reason: behind this door there is a beautiful narrow staircase that has been recently restored, so it would add a great accent to the kitchen to be able to see through the door into the lit up staircase].
Pictures are attached. There is a top view, in case that helps understand what type of door I am dealing with.
Thank you in advance,
Max
 

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That door is cope and stick, somewhat like a cabinet door is made. The mold you see there is actually cut into the rail and stiles, it is not individual molding.

You still can do what you want, it is just going to be a little more difficult. Use yur router or a circular saw with the blade set at the right depth will work to cut the molded edge off. You will need a guide for either, because most people can not cut that much without making a bobble and mess it all up.

After cutting that profile off, remove the panels, replace with glass and install new molding. If you have a router, that molding is not that hard to make.

I would suggest cutting just enough to remove the paint on the rail and stiles so it would save you grief installing the new mold. Oh, you would only have to do that on one side of the door.

One more thing, paint the back of the molding that you put back in or you will see a raw edge from the other side through the glass.
 

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I might just make a jig for the router to follow and with a straight bit cut the stile and rail profile from the back side of the door to a depth approaching the profile on the front of the stiles and rails. This would allow the panels to be removed and leave a rabbit in the back the same as a picture frame would have to mount the glass.
 

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what bigjim said...

I cut out a panel on a cheap unfinished slab entry door I bought at lowes that way... and replaced it with with a glass design that I made with some clear and textured glass and some lead came... put some molding back up to hold it all in place..

made the door seem like some sorta expensive custom thing. People had no clue it was just a $150 slab door with maybe $20 of glass and lead came.. plus an hour of my time...

I only had one panel to deal with but it wasn't that difficult. I am sure you can do the same..
 

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You may want to reconsider the number of panels you glaze. By volume, glass is nearly 4 times heaver than air dried yellow pine (a heavier softwood). Also, safety glazing is required in doors, adjacent to doors and within 24'' of doors; laminated, tempered or wire glass. Laminated is often heavier since its two sheets, tempered has to be ordered to size and wire-glass makes it look like you live in a chicken coop.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ok guys, thank you!
I'll be trying one of these weekends.
..and I may be back with more questions!
Max
 

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Doors require tempered glass---call for prices before you get your heart set on adding glass---
 

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On a lot of those doors the profile on one side is made when the stiles and rails are run thru the molder .The other side is applied.Make sure you take a utility knife and cut away the paint to check both sides before going to to much trouble.
 
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