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I have tried searching for the answer before posting a new thread, but I was unable to figure it out, so I am asking for some help. I recently purchased an old adobe construction house, with old baseboard heaters. House built in 1991, heaters made in 2002. They needed updating, so I thought it would be a simple switch, I even bought nearly identical heaters.

They are 120V units and the previous ones were hardwired. Upon pulling the faceplate off, I saw two sets of wires (appears to be 12/2). After testing them, I discovered only one hot wire out of the 6. Two obvious grounds, and 3 others (I assume neutrals).

The previous heater was connected with wire labeled "16/2 type HPN heater cord". This cord only had two wires, and the unit was not grounded. The two ground wires were wrapped together inside the wall box.

I bought new 12/2 Romex to wire the new heater to from the wall to unit. I plan on using the known hot, neutral and ground to connect, simple enough. But I'm confused as what to do with the other set of wires, since they were previously connected to that "heater cord".

Hope this makes sense, and thanks for any help.

--The 3 wires on the left of the picture are coming from the top of the box, and the 3 on the right are coming from the right. I marked the one hot wire with black electrical tape on the left.
 

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In further diagnosing the circuit, I found the reason for the extra set of wires was because this box is in the middle of the circuit. Now I'm really confused on how to wire this back up...
 

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It's hard to figure out old wiring without a tester.
I'll guess there was a wall mount thermostat? That would explain the extra wiring.
But you already know what wires are hot so turn off the breaker and recheck all of the wires. When you are sure they are all off then you can use a tester to trace them out and see where they go. Relatively inexpensive and designed for use on DE-ENERGIZED circuits, they consist of a tone generator and a receiver.
And a home built in 1991 is not an old house in any sense.
 
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