DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wondering how bad it is to have a couple of screws through the Tyvek moisture barrier in an exterior wall.

We want to install a baby gate on our deck. One side of it can go into a deck post, but the other side would be against a wall. There's no room to easily put another post on that side.

That wall has T-111 siding on top of OSB sheathing and Tyvek. What I'm planning to do is screw a 2x4 to the siding, with screws going into both the wall sill plate and a window rough sill. But those screws would be going through the Tyvek. Then we would attach the gate to the 2x4.

And this is probably temporary. Once our kid is old enough, we will take down the gate, and will probably want to remove the 2x4 as well. If we remove screws, that would leave empty holes in the tyvek.

This is on a wall with a large roof eave, so doesn't get a lot rain on it. But is this foolish anyway? Any suggestions to minimize the damage?

Thanks!
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
63,354 Posts
Wondering how bad it is to have a couple of screws through the Tyvek moisture barrier in an exterior wall.

We want to install a baby gate on our deck. One side of it can go into a deck post, but the other side would be against a wall. There's no room to easily put another post on that side.

That wall has T-111 siding on top of OSB sheathing and Tyvek. What I'm planning to do is screw a 2x4 to the siding, with screws going into both the wall sill plate and a window rough sill. But those screws would be going through the Tyvek. Then we would attach the gate to the 2x4.

And this is probably temporary. Once our kid is old enough, we will take down the gate, and will probably want to remove the 2x4 as well. If we remove screws, that would leave empty holes in the tyvek.

This is on a wall with a large roof eave, so doesn't get a lot rain on it. But is this foolish anyway? Any suggestions to minimize the damage?

Thanks!
When you remove the 2x4 you can fill the hole with a screw or caulk or something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, all. @ryansdiydad, it's true that the siding is nailed through the Tyvek, but I think those nail heads hold the tyvek tight against the stud, which seems like it would seal moisture a lot better than a random screw from ouside the siding will. And of course those nails are never removed.

@Nealtw, after I remove the 2x4, I was planning on using caulk and/or wood filler in the siding, and then painting over it. But that won't fill the hole in the Tyvek. I guess I could find a trim-head screw of same gauge, drive that in flush with the siding, then caulk/paint over that. Sound good?
 

·
Naildriver
Joined
·
18,593 Posts
So you didn't cut away the siding. Nix the Tyvek tape. Once the hole is exposed, use a good caulk (narrow tip) and push caulk deep into the hole, finish it off on the outside and paint it. That way you have caulk through the hole, sealing it all up.
 
  • Like
Reactions: acordeon2

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So you didn't cut away the siding. Nix the Tyvek tape. Once the hole is exposed, use a good caulk (narrow tip) and push caulk deep into the hole, finish it off on the outside and paint it. That way you have caulk through the hole, sealing it all up.
That is a really good idea! Think I'll try that. Thanks!
 

·
retired framer
Joined
·
63,354 Posts
Drive a screw thru a chunk of 1/2" plywood and remove it, then set the plywood on top of a bucket and put that where a lawn sprinkler will hit it and see just how little water you get in the bucket. Then compare the rain you would get on a vertical wall compared to the sprinkler.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top