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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think a LONG while back I took some advise's on this, and I just really wanted to get it in up and running.
so I did make a lot of short cut's and certainly a few things which where not right.
so now I have got round to actually doing it right :)
I "do" understand it was not fully correct. so please keep those comments to a minimum.
As I am now trying to make amends :)


So I'm going to remove the wiring (flex cord) and plug top and in-place running some proper cable
I've over guesstimated a 15' run (about 12' actual)
so I have put some pictures of my hack job, and wanna ask some questions,

1> I was planning on using 12/2 cable (I understand is 20A rated)
The flood light is a low powered LED flood, giving 150-200 watts, but not at that level
2> 15' run
3> Use wire nut's in the back box
i> do I need a grommet
ii> in the back box there looks to be some cable clamps, is it ok to just use that ?
4> use existing cable ties ?
i> do they need to be stapled down or in trunking

I'm not sure of the best way to do this, pls advise which is better
5> receptacle box
i> run cable straight into recep. box, connect to one of them using pigtails (no isolation in this case)
ii> fit a second box above the first one which is just a switch, pigtail from one of the receptacles to the new 2nd box to the switch
(do I need the ability to isolate the flood light)

Many thxs in advance
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You are in good shape to fix this. I did some temporary work in my house that was admittedly insane with wires dangling all over the place to keep light available, splices to old wire here and there working in stages led to sometimes leaving long new romex hanging so that I could run it around a corner when the day arrived that I could remove the old wiring under old siding.

But what you have currently is just a small step below what you will have when it is more professional. You basically did all the work but in just a plug-to-junction-box-with-extension-cord-wire method.

I don't see a switch box so I wonder if this is a switched exterior light or some kind of hardwired security light?

If this is exterior then that final outside box needs to be a weatherproof box that is compatible with the floodlight. That final box you have pictured is interior only.
I buy these things...but they only accommodate specific threaded connectors.

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I have security lights that are also on a switch for when I want to turn the light off for some reason or have it always on instead of on motion sensor. Yes, being able to control the flood light is good. You can put that switch wherever you want to.

The first decision is if you use metal clad cable or basic insulated yellow Romex.

but you have metal boxes so you can use either metal clad cable or yellow romex. If you use plastic boxes your HAVE TO use romex. The advantage of metal clad in your case is it's exposed and arguably "could be damaged" by a falling canoe. And because you already have metal clad it keeps some consistency to use metal clad.
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I'd say get a 25 foot roll of metal clad like that metal clad cable coming out of that outlet box. probably 12/2. They do sell 15 foot rolls too.

You'll see the exact kind of box connector they used on that outlet box, but there are also fancy ones now that eliminate the lock nut that has to be tightened from the inside. Snap connectors.

dunno. there are so many choices of box connectors today I get confused. Probably 20 options. I'm used to the lock nuts but this new method is also good. the key is compatibility so if you get metal clad and connectors you make sure they are compatible with the cable inside the store or in the parking lot. I don't even wait anymore to get home because there are so many ways to get incompatible combinations it's crazy. Just check it right at the store. The connectors have to be compatible/fit with every box you plan to use them with.
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That's really it. I think the best way is to work backwards from the destination flood light---->Switch----->Outlet splice.

you should not only turn off the breaker, checking the absence of voltage and then locking out the breaker box is a good habit so that circuit isn't turned on by someone accidentally while you are splicing into it.

the shopping list is like:

25' metal clad 12/2
4 x 1/2" metal clad cable box connectors
metal clad box connectors with threads for exterior box
exterior waterproof light box
metal box for light switch
toggle switch
switch cover plate
flood light box (looks like you already have this but it's only for interior)
flood light
looks like you might need a green ground screw for that light box...which are only sold in bags.
bag of 1/2" MC cable straps. Those zip tie things have served their purpose and shouldn't be used for this.
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does that help?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey there txs for the awesome and indepth reply.

so

* The external light is an enclosed floodlight (see video below) under an eaves so a bit protected from running water, I drilled a hole and passed the wires through and connected it to the box, box is in my garage, and I think the original electrician said as far as code is concerned the garage altthough internal to the house is considered external.

* He was the one originally who fit the outlet, (there was only one in the garage and he added 2, risk of damage with cars and work he said it is best to use armored cable. no car get's anywhere near the wall LOL

I really wanted to use Romex, due to cost, not sure what code says

there is no switch box to the light, it stays on permanently comes on at dusk, with a DIP switch setting, doesnt "NEED" to have a switch but wondering if I should have one

the box with the wires is INSIDE the garage, so it should be ok to have an interior ? the floodlight outside has a kind of box already on the outside and sealed with silicone.

actually I think I understand why you said armoured, because as you say the consitance already with the existing armoured cabling

The video, actually shows how I originally ran it, just drilled a hole and wire nut it, the pic above shows I decided to put a box on it
the vid at least shows you the light and stuff

txs again

 

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that is your video. ok.
I think romex is an option. it just uses completely different box connectors and straps and it gets tedious to stock all the options for metal clad and romex at the same time...in a tight area like your garage.

I used romex exposed in my garage in the rafters and on the walls. Just be strategic where you put it so it's not at bumper level. There are ways to run romex so it's not in the worst possible spot for cable that can be hit with a rake or bumper. If the only way it will be damaged is if someone runs a car through the garage wall then I think that's safe cuz metal clad will also be damaged just as badly. that's how I think of it anyway. I also used metal clad...which really ends up being a few dollars difference when you deal with that short distance. I mean, it's slightly more expensive.
25' of romex is $25.
25' of metal clad is $26.
maybe these prices are different in your area.

I see, so the flood light is already mounted outside and the wire runs to a junction box inside through the wall. ok. The lights I've bought have to be attached to a box because there is no space to stuff the wires and my light was outside an area in a ceiling so I could only access the box from the outside so that's where the box needed to be. You have access from the inside. Got it. yer good.

as long as that last box inside has some kind of strain relief so a person can't just pull the metal clad cable or romex right out of it then you are good. Then use some straps to run it flush with the wall where it won't get damaged.

I would add a switch because those lights have this feature where you flick the power on and off and it becomes manual.. u can''t do that without a switch.

and you'll need a cover that fits that jbox. and a ground pigtail and screw from the box to that wire nut with the other green wires.
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
that is your video. ok.
I think romex is an option. it just uses completely different box connectors and straps and it gets tedious to stock all the options for metal clad and romex at the same time...in a tight area like your garage.
Awesome txs again, I'll double check prices where I am, I'm liking the idea of consistency. if it's only a few bucks difference should be ok, I'm thinking if looking to see how much space is in the outlet, if 2 cramped I may put another box, I like the idea of it being switched, for maintenance etc, and not having to keep running to the basement to pull the breaker.
 

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if you do wiring inside your house then Romex is going to be the standard option...in which case you are stuck with trying to stock everything or else buying exactly what you need for every project.

if 2 cramped I may put another box, I like the idea of it being switched, for maintenance etc, and not having to keep running to the basement to pull the breaker.
It should accommodate 1 more trio of wires, but if it doesn't then use a metal bigger box or a deeper metal box. yeah, having a panel in a basement far from the garage means someone might sneak in there and turn the breaker on while you are splicing into it. Lock out/Tag Out.

Train everyone around you to not touch the panel when there are locks on it and also not to sneak up on you when you are doing electrical work. Treat it like a hazardous zone...quarantined while working on electrical.
 

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The only thing I would add is that you will be best served using BX instead of cable.
You can paint it to match your walls, it will protect the wires and a quick search shows the price difference between Romex and BX is negligible.
Whether or plan it or not, things always get laid against the walls in a garage.
BX will make that less of an issue.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I wonder if I have BX cable fitted already. I painted that cable that browney/yellowey color if you see the pic

The only thing I would add is that you will be best served using BX instead of cable.
You can paint it to match your walls, it will protect the wires and a quick search shows the price difference between Romex and BX is negligible.
Whether or plan it or not, things always get laid against the walls in a garage.
BX will make that less of an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
actually I think it is BX, looking at pictures on line, and from memory when he was installing it, I was calling it armored cable, I think the electrician called it armored as well.
 

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I think MC cable is a better choice than AC cable. MC has a dedicated ground conductor. AC depends on the spiral sheath and a thin bond conductor.
 
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It's been quite a few years since I used armoured cable. The various designations confuse me - I thought it was now called AC90 in Canada. I'm not exactly sure why you want to use it. Unless you need to protect it from chewing or something, if your only concern is mechanical protection in a garage, there are other ways to protect Romex. I don't think it worth the extra costs for what you are trying to do.

Keep in mind that with armoured cable you have to use different box connectors and it can be tricky to cut without nicking the conductors inside. You used to have to use plastic inserts called 'anti shorts' but I don't know if that is still Code.
 

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I think MC cable is a better choice than AC cable. MC has a dedicated ground conductor. AC depends on the spiral sheath and a thin bond conductor.
Has it been a while since you have seen or purchased any BX?
Everything I have seen in the last 20 years has had a ground wire.
 
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