DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My home inspector found the bare ground wire from the main switch box was cut near the ground, he said the ground wire end should go under 4feet in the ground. However, I found out later the wire is side-connected to a TV cable line which goes deep in the ground, is the home inspector wrong or I still need to get this corrected?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
The SE ground should be connected directly to the grounding rod. It can share the rod with the TV antenna ground, but it must not be broken or spliced between the panel and the rod, and must have its own ground clamp on the rod.
It is OK for the TV antenna ground to be connected to the SE ground though.
The ground rod must be driven into the ground at least 8 ft.

If there is a metallic water pipe coming into the house, there must also be a ground from the SE panel (separate from the one to the ground rod I believe) to the street side of the cold water pipe.
There must also be a jumper around the water meter and/or any non-metallic parts in the cold water supply so that the entire water supply system is at ground potential.
In addition, there must be a jumper across the hot water heater (from cold inlet to hot outlet) (assuming that metallic pipes are used).

I am not sure what the gauge of the grounding wire must be, but I am sure someone will add that.

FW
 

·
Household Handyman
Joined
·
2,480 Posts
KE2KB, are you quoting NEC or local codes on the jumper wire around the water meter? I don't know what good that would do around here, all water service piping leaving the main is plastic, and then PVC from the meter to the home(s). I've never seen the jumper on the water heater piping here either. Not to say it may not be NEC and no one follows it, these may be local codes in your area. Thanks, David
 

·
Electrical Contractor
Joined
·
1,054 Posts
Cold water pipe within 5' of where it enters the house only if metal and in contact with the earth for more than 10'
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,294 Posts
Could be a lot of things.

A home inspector doesn't know enough to tell you what needs to be done. Call an electrician for the whole stoty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,294 Posts
Not enough info. I need to see the whole system.

Call an electrician. Most still give free estimates.

You need.

1. Water bond. (wire from the neutral bus in the panel to the water piping system)

2. Gas bond.(wire from the neutral bus in the panel to the gas piping system)

3. Grounding conductor (wire from the neutral bus in the panel to the ground rods or rebar in the footing) In some cases (not in my area) the water pipe can be used in lieu of ground rods/ufer ground.

The stuff the cable[telco company hooks up is to bond their stuff to the electrical system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
KE2KB, are you quoting NEC or local codes on the jumper wire around the water meter? I don't know what good that would do around here, all water service piping leaving the main is plastic, and then PVC from the meter to the home(s). I've never seen the jumper on the water heater piping here either. Not to say it may not be NEC and no one follows it, these may be local codes in your area. Thanks, David
2005 NEC 250.104 section A(1) pretty much states that metal water piping needs to be bonded to the SE grounding system.
The conductor bypassing the water meter is apparently required in my case because the SE grounding conductor is bonded on the street side of the meter, and the meter cannot be part of the grounding system.

I have to look further for the requirement on bypassing the water meter, but I would think that if the entire metallic piping system needs to be bonded to the SE ground, then the bypass is necessary for the same reason that the water meter bypass is required.

I believe I did say that this applies only if pipe is metallic. Of course on a PVC or PEX system, this is not applicable.
I'll have to check the code. I may be reading 2008 code, which has not yet been adopted by many states/localities.

Regardless of code, wouldn't you think it is good practice to install the jumpers in these situations?

FW
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top