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How do I paint over 40 year old oil base-stained rough-sawn cedar that is heavily covered in nicotine?

It is a Wainscotting in the basement currently stained dark brown with an orange undertone.
We removed nicotine with TSP on the dry wall & concret walls. (Can anything be done on the rough cedar?)

Will a prime coat (benjamin Moore Fresh Start latex) stick to the nicotine on the rough cedar so that a medium tone latex gray paint can cover it without any blotches coming thru?

We have no windows in the basement... Should I Waite until we have Ohio spring weather and can open main floor Windows?
 

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Wash it and with a little heat down there and a couple of fans it will be dry enough to paint by the time you be ready to paint. It's not like the wood is going to be soaked completely through but only the surface. If a little damp a water base paint may possibly like it better.
 

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Cover stain will work but B-I-N is better (more expensive, too). Definitely will want some serious ventilation as both products smell to high heaven. Ohio weather is a fickle beast but some moderation in temps is expected late next week (highs in the 40's) so you could possibly open some windows then.
 
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I had the two worst chain smokers in Manitoba living in my building. When they moved out, not only could you see where pictures were hung on the walls, you could see where furniture was located by the nicotine stains on the floors. And, these idiots had two small children living in that apartment with them!!! They were giving their kids lung cancer.

Anyhow, cigarette smoke stains can be MOSTLY removed with just a water wash. You don't even need to use soap in the water because the stain dissolves in the water.

But, to remove the stain completely AND get rid of the nicotine smell, you need to use bleach. Wash the surfaces down with bleach diluted with 5 parts water and wait a few seconds for the stain to disappear. Then clean the bleach solution off with a sponge and ordinary water. This will remove the nicotine stain and smell rather than just encapsulate it.

Be careful using bleach over carpet because, depending on the kind of carpet fiber you have, bleach can take the colour out of the carpet.
 

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Agree and toss the TSP it will cause more problems than it will fix. Usually takes about 3 good rinsing to be sure it's all off the surface or it can cause adhesion problems with the paint. And I would also use one of the B-I-N products. It does have a strong odor but it dissipates pretty quick.
 

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Prime & Clean

Try to remove as much of the nicotine as you can before you start painting. Use a sponge, towel, and cleaning product. When you are done cleaning, prime all of the walls and areas with Kilz, oil-based primer.
An oil based primer will give you the best coverage and adhesion to hard to stick surfaces.
You may want to prime twice, two coats, before you start on your finish coatings.
 

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Try to remove as much of the nicotine as you can before you start painting. Use a sponge, towel, and cleaning product. When you are done cleaning, prime all of the walls and areas with Kilz, oil-based primer.
An oil based primer will give you the best coverage and adhesion to hard to stick surfaces.
You may want to prime twice, two coats, before you start on your finish coatings.[/QUOTE]

The oil based primer is arguable as Bin just plain works better.

One coat of Bin and your done.
 
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