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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New treadmill shorts out when we start it. Turns out we have a 15 amp circuit breaker when the treadmill requires 20amp. Unfortunately,we'll have to have other items on the circuit(tv, DVR,etc). Option 1 seems to be get an electrician to create a dedicated circuit. The home builder says for me to purchase a 'power conditioner'. found this on online: http://www.amazon.com/Furman-Standa...98WQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1331087305&sr=8-1

Not sure if this is the correct item or not. I'm a brand new homeowner and would rather not burn down the house in the 1st 6 months. Any information would be appreciated
 

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I'm personally perplexed as to how your builder thinks a power conditioner is going to change your current 15A circuit into the required 20A circuit. If the treadmill's manual says it requires a 20A circuit then that's what you ought to have for it. I'm sure the pros can provide more info if needed.
 

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I will not really bother with the power conditioner at all due the threadmills most will have DC motour in there and they have oddball electrical signal they can actually cause the AFCI to trip out fast.

One way you can test it is run a hevey duty extendison cord to the bathroom and run the threadmill unloaded to see if that kick out the GFCI if that kicked out then you have issue with threadmill itself if stay on during unloaded then I will say the AFCI is senstive to it.

What brand breaker box you have in there ??

Merci.
Marc
 

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How is a "Power Conditioner" going to fix the fact, that that circuit is overloaded. Once you placed the treadmill on it, which is probably a 12.5 to 14 amp load, on an already loaded down circuit, there in lies your problem. Do yourself a favor, and run a dedicated run of 12/2 for a 20 amp circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just an update...turns out it only required a 15amp regular breaker(vs. 15 amp arc fault breaker). The issue is now....by replacing, does that truly break National Electric Code which goes into the game room. "The 2008 NEC now requires the technology to be installed in additional areas of the home, including dining rooms, living rooms, and other habitable areas." Should something happen, and worst case scenario where a fire would burn the house down....could my homeowners insurance not cover if Fire Inspector says that "I broke code? Putting the treadmill in the house isn't worth endangering my family nor negating my insurance in case of fire.
 

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rdesa2, no you are not breaking code. Your current panel is grandfathered under the codes in place at that time. Just because you installed or updated a circuit, does not mean that you are required to install a AFCI. If that was the case, every circuit in my panel feeding living spaces, would have AFCI breakers. I am covered, because the panel was installed in 2003, and only the bathroom, basement, garage, outside outlet, and kitchen in my case are required to have GFCI, but guess what. I do not have any AFCI breakers, because under the code at the time the panel was installed, it was not required, because it did not change the code of the original panel, which was a fuse panel, installed back around 1937.

Now of course, if I want to spend the money to put in AFCI breakers, I could, you can do it yourself, but you are not breaking any laws.
 
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