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Discussion Starter #1
I just had new vinyl plank floor put down. I hired a local professional to do the work. The floor looks great, but...whenever we walk on certain spots, the floor pops. The popping is the result of the floor sticking to the old adhesive. Honestly, it’s driving me crazy. When the work was being done, I noticed there was still some leftover glue still on the floor, but I assumed the professional installer knew what he was doing. We paid the installer to remove and dispose of the old flooring and install the new vinyl plank. My question is should the installer have removed the glue or put something down before installing the new vinyl planks? The job is done and it’s about 750 square feet. I hate to go back to the installer, but I’m having a hard time dealing with all of the popping, particularly in the morning. Should he have have done something to deal with the old glue before putting down the new floor? If so, would it be reasonable to expect him to come back out and fix the problem? Thanks ahead for the input.
 

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How are your vinyl planks installed? Glue edge, click lock, etc? I would call him back to let him know you are displeased with the results. Having left glue residue on the floor, he should have either removed the glue, or installed a vapor barrier like 15# felt or 6 mil plastic to decouple the sticky residue from the new flooring. Others will chime in with their take on this so stay tuned.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for the reply. It is click lock with no glue. They basically banged it in place with hammer and blocks. Looking back, it seems like it would have been common sense to have put something down over the glue. He's been in the industry for a pretty long time, so I don't quite understand why he didn't think to do that.
 

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The installer must fix it. It was his oversight. I hope it was either the box store or a large flooring seller. It's easier to public shame them (last resort), if you're able.:smile:
If you know, check with the tile manufacturer also. I'm wondering if something in the vinyl softened the glue? Even if there was a incompatibility, still the installer. He just has to know about these things.
 

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I saw a video where the guy had a needle like you would use for inflating a soccer ball and he somehow attached that to a bottle of expanding foam. He drilled a tiny little hole in the floor and stick the needle in there and he was able to fill the void under the plank flooring super-easily. I might try it if I were in your shoes and didn't have much to lose.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I called the contractor and explained the problem. He said that's how they have always laid that type of plank, but...if I'm not happy he's willing to come pull it up and re-do it. He feels strongly that glue just isn't going to come up and asked if we would be happy if he pulls up the floor, puts down the 6 mil plastic over the slab, then reinstalls the floor. Do you all think the 6 mil plastic will solve the problem, without trying to get up the glue?
 

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Some click locks require that you put a backer of some type down, others don’t. Yours should have been installed per mfg. recommendations. Ron
 

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I think all that needed was a paper cover. 30lb felt or even as thin as rosin paper. If rosin, 2 layers and tape the overlaps. That the vinyl moved that much could be a concern. I would have thought that relatively heavy vinyl would stay down? He may have locked them too tight or not leave enough expansion gaps along the perimeter. Perimeter vinyl planks could be glued down and unable to move.


Also, I'm not sure where to get such, but dust the glue with fine sand or such to defeat the adhesive? Vacuum up the extra. Cement dust could work.
 

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I called the contractor and explained the problem. He said that's how they have always laid that type of plank, but...if I'm not happy he's willing to come pull it up and re-do it. He feels strongly that glue just isn't going to come up and asked if we would be happy if he pulls up the floor, puts down the 6 mil plastic over the slab, then reinstall the floor. Do you all think the 6 mil plastic will solve the problem, without trying to get up the glue?
Yes, I agree with the others. The plastic will solve the problem.

You never lay it over old glue for your reason. And the fact that some could end up being sort of glued down. And the planks need to expand evenly.

And it is never worth the effort to remove all the glue.
When tar paper or plastic sheathing is cheap and easy to put down. Solves the problem 100%. And even adds a vapor barrier for some protection from moisture migrating up from a crawl space or concrete slab.

He also should not charge you for this since he did not follow manufacturers installation requirements.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The installer is finally going to come back out this Monday to complete the job. The plan is to install the 6 mil polyfilm between the slab and the flooring. I may be overthinking things, but would there be a concern that some of the glue might have stuck to the bottom of the vinyl floor planks, such that now, there will be sticking between the film and the bottom of the vinyl plank?
 

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Yes, I agree with the others. The plastic will solve the problem.

You never lay it over old glue for your reason. And the fact that some could end up being sort of glued down. And the planks need to expand evenly.

And it is never worth the effort to remove all the glue.
When tar paper or plastic sheathing is cheap and easy to put down. Solves the problem 100%. And even adds a vapor barrier for some protection from moisture migrating up from a crawl space or concrete slab.

He also should not charge you for this since he did not follow manufacturers installation requirements.

The OP mentioned this vendor was quite experienced so you have to wonder why he cut corners when doing the work?

To the OP:

Was the work done by the person who owns the business?

Or was it done by those who working under him?
 
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