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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a Wooster Pro Classic Premium Grade (could not find Professional grade). Here is a link to the product - http://www.woosterbrush.com/brushes/catalog/wooster-pro-classic-wall-trim/wooster-pro-classic-wall-trim-thin-angle-sash/

I began applying Zissner 1-2-3 primer with it and it was working great. I finished then cleaned the brush with soapy water and let it dry for an hour or so. I began priming again and it began to get clumpy. Harder to paint in all the details of my cabinet doors.

The first time I primed I poured into a tray and put the lid back on tight. The second time I did the same, so I don't think it's the primer drying out or anything like that.

Did I do something wrong? Or is there a way to fix this?

Sorry, I'm sure this is painting 101.
Thanks
 

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Were you doing a second coat of primer? If the first coat wasn't completely dry, attempting to put a second coat on can lift some of the first layer.

Also, soap isn't necessary if you are using water-based paints. You have to rinse the dickens out of them, but no soap. I don't know for sure what residual soap would do to the finish, but it breaks surface tension and might have some bad consequences.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not a second coat of primer. Just the other side of the doors. Hmmm. The brush instructions say to clean with whatever the paint I'm using says. The primer said warm soapy water. I rinsed it really well. Kept going even after it ran clear.

But when it's wet, it clumps. I tried drying with a paper towel and it got a little better, but not anywhere near a dry brush. I'm waiting for it to dry right now so don't know if it will be better once dry.

Is this behavior normal? I thought a paint brush would work the same even if it was wet.
 

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I think it would have been best if you had wet the brush with water and shaken out the excess water before starting to paint with the 1-2-3.

What happens is that primer or paint gets high up in the bristles (near the ferrule) and dries up there while you're painting. Then, washing the brush is ineffective at removing that partially or fully dried paint, and the result is that the brush has a bad hair day. By putting water into the brush first, any latex primer or paint that gets high up in the bristles won't dry. The moisture there will keep the primer or paint from drying up, and not only will the brush wash out faster, it'll wash out more completely so that the bristles lay flat like they did when the brush was brand new.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think it would have been best if you had wet the brush with water and shaken out the excess water before starting to paint with the 1-2-3.

What happens is that primer or paint gets high up in the bristles (near the ferrule) and dries up there while you're painting. Then, washing the brush is ineffective at removing that partially or fully dried paint, and the result is that the brush has a bad hair day. By putting water into the brush first, any latex primer or paint that gets high up in the bristles won't dry. The moisture there will keep the primer or paint from drying up, and not only will the brush wash out faster, it'll wash out more completely so that the bristles lay flat like they did when the brush was brand new.
That's probably what happened. Any way of correcting it now since it is probably dry?
 

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Every gallon of "latex" paint from every manufacturer and every single synthetic bristle brush made by every brush manufacturer i have ever sold or even seen says to clean "latex" paint from them with soap and water. Every f-ing one of them for 32 years. I don't understand how anyone can question this.
 

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My question is "why clean it?" If you're just taking a break while one side of your doors is drying, wrap the brush in plastic, making sure the plastic is wrapped tight enough to keep any air out. I use Wal-Mart plastic bags to do this. Just make sure you don't wrap any printed part of the bag with your brush or the ink from the print will get on your brush.
 

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My question is "why clean it?" If you're just taking a break while one side of your doors is drying, wrap the brush in plastic, making sure the plastic is wrapped tight enough to keep any air out. I use Wal-Mart plastic bags to do this. Just make sure you don't wrap any printed part of the bag with your brush or the ink from the print will get on your brush.
I used the same brush and roller cover for 4 months when I built my deck and never cleaned them once. Just stuck them in a big ziplock bag every day.
 

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I think it would have been best if you had wet the brush with water and shaken out the excess water before starting to paint with the 1-2-3.

What happens is that primer or paint gets high up in the bristles (near the ferrule) and dries up there while you're painting. Then, washing the brush is ineffective at removing that partially or fully dried paint, and the result is that the brush has a bad hair day. By putting water into the brush first, any latex primer or paint that gets high up in the bristles won't dry. The moisture there will keep the primer or paint from drying up, and not only will the brush wash out faster, it'll wash out more completely so that the bristles lay flat like they did when the brush was brand new.
+1. and when using oil based products, dipping in mineral spirits beforehand is helpful as well.

one resource that has helped me immensely is Flexner's book, "understanding wood finishes." after many trips to the library to check out and return, my wife finally bought it for me this christmas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I cleaned it because I thought I was done. I forgot about the other sides haha. But my brush did come back to life once dry. The paint I'm using dries pretty quickly so I have to work fast and keep that brush moving or it starts clumping. Should I dip in water while painting if it starts to get clumpy? I'm using Insl-X Cabinet Coat.
 

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I guess by "clumpy" you mean paint is drying up into the bristles? That is pretty common with the fast drying primers and paints of today. I just keep a putty knife close by and use it to GENTLY scrape some of that clumpiness off.......you won't be able to get it all off, John, but you can scrape a good bit of it off. I wouldn't dip it in water as that water will find a way to run down the bristles and into your primer on the doors creating a small mess.
 

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That's probably what happened. Any way of correcting it now since it is probably dry?
Unless anyone else has a better idea...

I know that at the paint store I typically buy paint, they sell a powder you dissolve in water to loosen up the dried up paint in paint brushes. Maybe Klaatu knows the name of the stuff. I'd try that stuff and follow the directions on the package.
 

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Unless anyone else has a better idea...

I know that at the paint store I typically buy paint, they sell a powder you dissolve in water to loosen up the dried up paint in paint brushes. Maybe Klaatu knows the name of the stuff. I'd try that stuff and follow the directions on the package.
It's made by Savogran. Just called brush cleaner. It works well just follow the directions. Unlike the solvent based brush cleaners it is gentle on the brush and it is much less harmful to the environment. (it's the only brush cleaner I carry)

I think it's mostly TSP or Tsp-pf.
 

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I've had several of the purdy angle edge sash brushes for a few years, always use with latex, always wet brush before starting to pant, ALWAYS clean when I'm done using them for a few days (overnight is Saran Wrap and pop in the fridge) using plain old water and Dawn dish detergent, and they are just fine. Ron
 

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I've had several of the purdy angle edge sash brushes for a few years, always use with latex, always wet brush before starting to pant, ALWAYS clean when I'm done using them for a few days (overnight is Saran Wrap and pop in the fridge) using plain old water and Dawn dish detergent, and they are just fine. Ron
why?:huh:
 

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I've had several of the purdy angle edge sash brushes for a few years, always use with latex, always wet brush before starting to pant, ALWAYS clean when I'm done using them for a few days (overnight is Saran Wrap and pop in the fridge) using plain old water and Dawn dish detergent, and they are just fine. Ron
I've found that dish detergent works well because they contain additives to reduce soap residue on the dishes, and that keeps any soap from remaining in the brush filaments.
 
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