DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just installed a new duplex outlet in my garage, the cable was already run from previous owner. I installed a Leviton 8200IG
http://www.fruitridgetools.com/Stor...temDetail.aspx?sfid=136763&i=244985822&c=7735
What I get with my tester is OPEN GROUND. The ground is attached to the green screw. I wonder why I get open ground as a result. There's another circuit in the garage and it shows CORRECT on my tester.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
25,769 Posts
Did you open that box to see if that line started there? the ground wire is not 'grounded' wherever it started.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Which "box" are you talking about? The AC comes out of a junction box in the garage, maybe I should take a look at it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
OK so I checked where the line from the new outlet goes and it goes to that junction box. In that junction box it's all 2 wire, the ground from the new outlet is tie to the junction box chassis. For my new outlet do I need to have a little jumper from the ground screw to the box itself (chassis)?
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
25,769 Posts
If the box is grounded and the wire is attached to the box you should be good---test the box and see if it is grounded.

I am not very good at describing wiring----sorry if it's not easy to understand.--Mike--
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
25,769 Posts
The box does not need to be grounded----when the outlet is installed the screw will ground the box.

I try to avoid answering electrical questions---while I have a good working knowledge I live in an area where Romex is not allowed and all wiring is done with conduit (meaning all boxes and conduit are grounded.)

I'll do the best I can. There are a bunch of licensed electricians here--- They must all be out enjoying the weather.---Mike---
 

·
Electrical Contractor
Joined
·
3,368 Posts
You have installed an ISOLATED GROUND receptacle. Separate grounding wires have to be installed on the box and the receptacle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,618 Posts
The box does not need to be grounded----when the outlet is installed the screw will ground the box.---
I used to squash the ground wire between the switch (or receptacle) frame (yoke) and the metal box using the mounting screw but an inspector told me I couldn't do that. I was supposed to provide two ground wire ends (using pigtails if needed), one to attach to the switch frame and the other to attach to the box using the green screws provided. Or use a switch with a special spring clip at the end of the yoke where it screws on and then only one ground wire end is needed, attached to the switch yoke.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
OK so I checked where the line from the new outlet goes and it goes to that junction box. In that junction box it's all 2 wire, the ground from the new outlet is tie to the junction box chassis. For my new outlet do I need to have a little jumper from the ground screw to the box itself (chassis)?
In order for there to be an actual ground, the junction box needs to be grounded back at the panel. This is usually done through armored cable. You said the wires in the jbox were all 2-wire, so you need to trace the jbox to see if it actually attaches to the panel with armored cable, rather than Romex.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You have installed an ISOLATED GROUND receptacle. Separate grounding wires have to be installed on the box and the receptacle.
So what are my options?
Get a regular grounded outlet?


I think the junction box is grounded to the panel. I realized that the breaker for the garage is the same as the master bedroom and all those outlets are grounded
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
So what are my options?
Get a regular grounded outlet?


I think the junction box is grounded to the panel. I realized that the breaker for the garage is the same as the master bedroom and all those outlets are grounded
Do you have a bare grounding wire in the receptacle box? If so, I'd just get a regular duplex receptacle.
 

·
Electrical Contractor
Joined
·
127 Posts
I just installed a new duplex outlet in my garage, the cable was already run from previous owner. I installed a Leviton 8200IG
http://www.fruitridgetools.com/Stor...temDetail.aspx?sfid=136763&i=244985822&c=7735
What I get with my tester is OPEN GROUND. The ground is attached to the green screw. I wonder why I get open ground as a result. There's another circuit in the garage and it shows CORRECT on my tester.
If this outlet is in a garage then it should be a GFCI.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,618 Posts
Note that some armored cables including ordinary BX are not considered good and sufficient grounding conductors. Most qualifying armored flexible cables have a strip or wire for the grounding conductor running inside.

It is not unusual for loose connections to develop between the armored cable, the cable clamp, and/or the junction box at one or more locations, thus giving you an open ground.
 

·
General Contractor
Joined
·
84 Posts
If you aren't continuing the circuit/feeding another outlet after the GFCI then you just connect the LINE and you're done, there is no LOAD to connect.

BTW, does sound like previously stated that your junction box isn't carrying a good ground and even a GFCI outlet won't change that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I;m thinking the same thing!!! If it didn't work with an iso ground outlet I highly doubt it will work with a GFCI. Would it be the same result with a regular outlet?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,298 Posts
It may be different. Isolated ground receptacles require 2 grounding means. You only had one.

The result may be the same if the one end of the cable or the old wiring method is not grounded.
 
  • Like
Reactions: electures
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top