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Discussion Starter #1
Just a complaint about the term...

I wish they'd use terms for low voltage brackets that describe how they're built and not assume everyone would use "new construction" brackets for new construction. If you're making a receptacle sized hole in the wall, what's the big deal about making it 3/4" wider so you could attach the bracket to a stud to make it stronger? You could use a chisel to cut the drywall that's over the stud.

My case is a little more complex because I think I have wire mesh and bracing, and the bracing is narrower and thicker than a steel stud, but the plaster may be thick enough so I could screw a new construction bracket into the mesh after chipping away some plaster.
 

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E2 Electrician
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Just a complaint about the term...

I wish they'd use terms for low voltage brackets that describe how they're built and not assume everyone would use "new construction" brackets for new construction. If you're making a receptacle sized hole in the wall, what's the big deal about making it 3/4" wider so you could attach the bracket to a stud to make it stronger? You could use a chisel to cut the drywall that's over the stud.

My case is a little more complex because I think I have wire mesh and bracing, and the bracing is narrower and thicker than a steel stud, but the plaster may be thick enough so I could screw a new construction bracket into the mesh after chipping away some plaster.
What the heck are you talking about?
 

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Sparky
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'Old work' items can in most cases be installed without patching the finished wall, and do not require an adjacent stud

'New work' items require a stud, and patching of existing finishes
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Yeah, new work brackets in old walls require patching, but if you're installing low voltage brackets, I think you can handle a small patch. I found a new construction bracket with three tabs instead of two, for "extra secure mounting." If two aren't always strong enough, it makes me wonder why I should try an even weaker old work bracket.
 

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E2 Electrician
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I don't think new work items always require patching. They just require a fastener driven into a stud, usually. If the wall is solid concrete it wouldn't even need a stud, and I think the mesh in my wall would work with the right fastener. To confuse things more, I found a new construction bracket with three tabs instead of two, for "extra secure mounting." If two aren't always strong enough, it makes me wonder why I should try an even weaker old work bracket.
I've been in the trade a long time and have never had an issue with either new work devices, or old work... not really sure what you are trying to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sorry...I edited my post since you replied...I just want to install a low voltage ring and discovered my choices and I was wondering why I shouldn't choose the strongest. My local big box store doesn't carry new work low voltage rings and I have to go out of my way to get them. I think they're under appreciated.
 

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E2 Electrician
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Sorry...I edited my post since you replied...I just want to install a low voltage ring and discovered my choices and I was wondering why I shouldn't choose the strongest. My local big box store doesn't carry new work low voltage rings and I have to go out of my way to get them. I think they're under appreciated.
Heres a little tip for you, just nail a plaster ring to the stud, no box.


 

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Yeah, new work brackets in old walls require patching, but if you're installing low voltage brackets, I think you can handle a small patch. I found a new construction bracket with three tabs instead of two, for "extra secure mounting." If two aren't always strong enough, it makes me wonder why I should try an even weaker old work bracket.
Then patch the freaking thing and quit making a big deal about nothing. There are umpteen million different versions of low volt mounts out there. Just because the big box store you went to only had a couple types, doesn't mean that manufacturers have to change the way they name their products. Sheese.
 
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E2 Electrician
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Then patch the freaking thing and quit making a big deal about nothing. There are umpteen million different versions of low volt mounts out there. Just because the big box store you went to only had a couple types, doesn't mean that manufacturers have to change the way they name their products. Sheese.
Or learn how to install them... lol...
 

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Use something like this and you will only have one ring to cut in.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Use something like this and you will only have one ring to cut in.
I know, but I actually don't want two keystone plates. I want one keystone and one telephone. I just didn't buy the telephone plate yet. I want one label for each of the two coax plugs, so I'll use keystone for that. Then I want a real phone jack next to it. I don't think they make a real keystone telephone jack. I'd have to get an extra wide jack, whatever it's called, and put the phone plug in the center. That could be confusing, especially to a future tenant, and residential telephone repair people may not do keystone.
 

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I'm not even going to try to explain. You go with your plan.
 
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Discussion Starter #16
I'm not even going to try to explain. You go with your plan.
Now I'm finding RJ11 keystone jacks on the internet. I think Home Depot only had RJ45 when I checked. Anyway, I want a separate label for each keystone hole and I can't get that with more than two holes per plate. And Wikipedia says "Keystone wall plates are used in commercial and industrial buildings..." so I'm worried it could cause problems in an apartment if it needs to be replaced. I addressed this here. I'm trying to be tenant friendly.

Anyway, thanks for beginning to try to help.
 

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E2 Electrician
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I know, but I actually don't want two keystone plates. I want one keystone and one telephone. I just didn't buy the telephone plate yet. I want one label for each of the two coax plugs, so I'll use keystone for that. Then I want a real phone jack next to it. I don't think they make a real keystone telephone jack. I'd have to get an extra wide jack, whatever it's called, and put the phone plug in the center. That could be confusing, especially to a future tenant, and residential telephone repair people may not do keystone.
Not sure why you are making this so hard on yourself for.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Not sure why you are making this so hard on yourself for.
Well, now I see they make the plate I originally wanted. Leviton 42080-4IP. And they have RJ11 Keystone jacks, so I may be changing my plans and going with a two gang low voltage bracket. I couldn't find these things before. I'm still a little worried about telephone repair people being able to fix keystone jacks. I'll look into that.

I'm making this hard on myself for the sake of future tenants. I wish the builders of this building did the same in the 1960s and installed coax jacks in the bedrooms.
 

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E2 Electrician
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Well, now I see they make the plate I originally wanted. Leviton 42080-4IP. And they have RJ11 Keystone jacks, so I may be changing my plans and going with a two gang low voltage bracket. I couldn't find these things before. I'm still a little worried about telephone repair people being able to fix keystone jacks. I'll look into that.

I'm making this hard on myself for the sake of future tenants. I wish the builders of this building did the same in the 1960s and installed coax jacks in the bedrooms.
Just a heads up, most people just have a cell phone now a days...
 
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