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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Everyone,
I have finished a complete rewire of my place... but before I called for an inspection I had a contractor take a look at my work. Everything looks good except for the way I have the grounding set up.

This first diagram is how I actually have it wired.


And this is a pictures of the actual panel (before I wired it) showing where the main wires would go


After talking with the contractor he stated that my grounding wire needs to be continuous from the wire poured in the foundation, through the main panel, and over to the meter.
He also stated that the ground wire needs to be connected to all the conduit with these:


Furthermore, he said that I need to have an additional grounding rod driven into the ground, and from there run a wire to the main water line then back to the ground wire that is poured into the foundation then back to the meter. Here is a diagram that shows it the best I can.

I believe him on the conduit connections but am not convinced on the continuous wire, or second grounding rod.

Any input would be greatly appreciated.
Also, if a continuous wire is needed... how can you splice #4 AWG copper?
 

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You must have some local amendments. The NEC would only require the UFER ground and the rod electrode would not be needed. The GEC would only need to be continous to the UFER, not to all the electrodes all together.


Some power companies will not allow grounding to take place in the socket.

The connections on the GEC would need to be made in an irreversible manner like a hydraulic crimp or a welded connection like a Cadweld.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You must have some local amendments. The NEC would only require the UFER ground and the rod electrode would not be needed. The GEC would only need to be continous to the UFER, not to all the electrodes all together.


Some power companies will not allow grounding to take place in the socket.

The connections on the GEC would need to be made in an irreversible manner like a hydraulic crimp or a welded connection like a Cadweld.
Thanks for the Quick Reply Jim.
I just need to clarify a few things.
UFER = Wire Poured in Foundation?
GEC = Grounding Electrode? - Is this the wire that runs from the panel to the meter?
 

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The reason I ask is the panel in the pic is an MLO. The UFER GEC must be continuous #4awg to the main disconnect panel grounding terminal bar. The wiring diagram shows the meter by itself and should have a main disconnect combination.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The reason I ask is the panel in the pic is an MLO. The UFER GEC must be continuous #4awg to the main disconnect panel grounding terminal bar. The wiring diagram shows the meter by itself and should have a main disconnect combination.
In case it matters... this is the existing electrical meter with a new main panel.
So since the meter doesn't have a disconnect, and there is a main disconnect on the panel and my UFER is continuous into the grounding terminal bar in the panel... is it wired correctly?

Or are you saying that I need to crimp the two grounds together and run it back to the meter as a "continuous" wire? Regardless if the meter has a disconnect.
 

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Where is the disconnect for the panel?
Are you installing a backfed breaker?
 

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In case it matters... this is the existing electrical meter with a new main panel.
So since the meter doesn't have a disconnect, and there is a main disconnect on the panel and my UFER is continuous into the grounding terminal bar in the panel... is it wired correctly?

Or are you saying that I need to crimp the two grounds together and run it back to the meter as a "continuous" wire? Regardless if the meter has a disconnect.
So there is a main disconnect at the panel shown in the pic now? If so then the cabling from the meter must be conduited to the MLO Where the #4 awg must go continuously to the UFER #4 rebar or Concrete encased electrode #6 or #4 electrode depending on what the service size is.
 

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You must have a disconnect at the meter or at the panel unless you intend to have only six breakers in the panel. Normally there is no grounding conductor fromm the meter to the panel as per most utilities requirement--there are exceptions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So there is a main disconnect at the panel shown in the pic now? If so then the cabling from the meter must be conduited to the MLO Where the #4 awg must go continuously to the UFER #4 rebar or Concrete encased electrode #6 or #4 electrode depending on what the service size is.
Yes, see picture above. The main disconnect is in the Main Panel.

Sorry for being a little ignorant here but I'm going to break down your statement to make sure im following correct.y

From the Meter run the ground wire (through conduit) to my main panel (MLO)
and continue (without a break in the copper) into the UFER (#4 wire 20' encased in concrete)

Which mean, I need to splice the two ground wires in the panel pictured above?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
You must have a disconnect at the meter or at the panel unless you intend to have only six breakers in the panel. Normally there is no grounding conductor fromm the meter to the panel as per most utilities requirement--there are exceptions.
I definitely have a disconnect at the panel... but from you experience you don't think that the wire from the main panel to the meter is required...

Interesting.

Since I already have the wire installed, is there any downside to it?
 

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You do not splice the wires in the panel. You land them on the proper neutral/grounding buss of the panel. Why is the disconnect not shown in the picture?
 

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Mlo

See picture below. The disconnect is in the Main Panel (Shown as a red box)


Im not even sure what a backfed breaker is... so no, I'm not using one.
What is shown is a Main Lug Only panel that is fed to the lug terminals shown. To use this panel with a disconnect, the main feeder needs to be connected to the main breaker to heat up the phase busses that are essentially backfed. This main breaker needs to be bolted to the frame to make it a listed code compliant installation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
What is shown is a Main Lug Only panel that is fed to the lug terminals shown. To use this panel with a disconnect, the feeders need to be connected to the main breaker to heat up the phase busses that are essentially backfed. This main breaker needs to be bolted to the frame to make it a listed code compliant installation.
Yeah, sorry for the confusion... I did install the "bolt in" main breaker. So it does disconnect the phase buses.
This is exactly what I installed

 
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