DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Okay, this is admittedly premature, but I wanted to ask first as I’m worried (confident?!) I’m going to encounter some problems:

I’ve stripped all my interior doors and am ready to re-paint. While it’s a beautiful 95-year-old Edwardian, unfortunately, much of my door hardware is probably going to get replaced as it’s just not great quality. My concern though is the hinges. The old hinges/doors/frames had 95 years of settling and shifting in seismic San Francisco, and work well together. I know I can easily obtain identical hinges…my fear is that the moment I put new hinges on, nothing’s going to work or line up anymore.

Again, I haven’t actually done it yet so things may turn out perfectly, but are there any general advice/tips/rules to follow for putting new hinges on older doors like this to help avoid problems??

Thanks so much, and for what it's worth, here's the current hardware:
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/kI21for8BprAzGShANpB8OIf582Pg2nLFCWKZ6z9vOc?feat=directlink
 

·
Too Short? Cut it Again!
Joined
·
9,634 Posts
Used to live out your way. You are approaching this as I wish more people did.

You are probably going to have to redo the hinges so read up on the tools, jigs and so forth you will need. Find some crusty old bastard to walk you through the process?

You must certainly have people doing the sorts of things you need out your way but call these folks if you hit a snag. I used them long before moving back to this region for all sorts of hinge and door hardware challenges. They have some "how to" guides for replacing hinges on old doors and making them work in antique framing.

http://www.wilmettehardware.com/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,118 Posts
Assuming leaf thickness, etc, is the same, if the new hinges fit into the old mortises, they should work. Chances are the hinges are thinner, unless you buy really good quality hardware.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,194 Posts
The main issue with a hinge switch is the hole line up. They have to be in the exact same position( or at least 1/4" away) or you'll have issues. If the holes are off by less then 1/4", the screws will not hold properly.
 

·
A door a day is all I ask
Joined
·
103 Posts
Hi there,
You can find replica and antique door hardware online.
We found enough matching antique hardware on eBay to do
all of the doors in our remodel.
Also if you live in or near a large city; there will be building salvage
yards that have boxes and bins chock full of antique hardware....
Fun places to check out if you have one within a reasonable distance.

Modern hinges should work okay as replacements. Standard residential hinges
will probably be a little thinner than your existing old ones. If that presents a problem
with hinge binding you can put thick paper or thin cardboard shims behind them to make up the difference.

If the holes don't line up exactly right you can drive 1/8" or 3/16" dowels into the existing holes.
Cut them off flush and redrill holes using a self centering drill bit. Snappy and Vix are the two companies
that I know of. Snappy is more readily available but Vix is better quality and has a little more bore depth.

Best of luck with your soulful old house!
RC/DG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Thanks for everyone’s help.

Keith, to reply: I’m certainly not an expert, I simply assumed the quality wasn’t good because the finish was all rubbing off (i.e., they likely aren’t solid brass).

So…went to a local hardware specialty store here on Saturday: The guy said these were common hinges (I think he said “S&W”? I know they have a clover leaf stamped on them if that helps). While they definitely had new hinges that were absolutely identical, he reaffirmed my fear that new hinges won’t line up as well…and thus recommended I just get these refinished. In the end, I think this is a good route to go: things will line up, the mortise work is already set up for these, etc.

On a side note: I’d also taken all my other door hardware (keyhole covers, rosettes, back plates, etc.) down there to look into replacing it. It was absolutely killing me to even think about replacing original hardware, but after getting all the paint off them, I realized they were all shiny brass…which I hate and feel looks tacky on white doors. So…the great news was that they suggested just using some “brass ager” on everything. I saw some pieces there they’d done, and they actually looked quite good -- it looks like you can take things to an antiqued brass state or all the way dark, similar to oil-rubbed bronze -- so I’m very happy I’ve found a way to keep the original hardware (which in fact is all solid brass).

Thanks again for all your help
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Okay, maybe I do have a follow-up question here:

I just tested my hinges with a magnet, and sure enough...they're steel. I guess I'm just wondering, are steel hinges good? I really have no background on hinges, but I would assume solid brass would have been preferable, no??

I guess what I'm getting at is...is it worth spending money having steel hinges electroplated? There are certainly benefits to re-using the old hinges, but given that I could literally buy replacement hinges for the exact same amount, I just wanted to make sure I wasn't investing a lot of money in what may be cheap quality hinges.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,194 Posts
Okay, maybe I do have a follow-up question here:

I just tested my hinges with a magnet, and sure enough...they're steel. I guess I'm just wondering, are steel hinges good? I really have no background on hinges, but I would assume solid brass would have been preferable, no??

I guess what I'm getting at is...is it worth spending money having steel hinges electroplated? There are certainly benefits to re-using the old hinges, but given that I could literally buy replacement hinges for the exact same amount, I just wanted to make sure I wasn't investing a lot of money in what may be cheap quality hinges.
The hinges have lasted 95 years.
Steel is harder then brass.
But solid brass is prettier.
But the steel ones fit perfectly.
Seems like an easy decision to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,284 Posts
The side of the deoor jamb is one piece so, unless the door is already falling off the hinges, replacing the hinges with the same size will not change the behavior of the door.

Replacing steel with brass or vice versa won't make a difference unless the door is very heavy in which case steel will last longer.

Suggest opening the door, using a wedge on the floor to hold it in position, then replace the hinges one at a time. I if the hinge pin is closer to or further away from the door than the old hinge, take off all except the top hinge, replace the bottom hinge, brace the top of the door, replace the top hinge, then replace the middle inge(s).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
500 Posts
The only problem I can see is the screw holes being stripped, doesn't take much.

One trick that works well (as the doorguy already mentioned) is the golf tee in the hole trick, push it in and snap it off, and the screw will hold.

Either that or use a bit longer screws, just be careful not to put the jamb out of whack.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top