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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

Just finished first layer of primer on new drywall in basement.
Wondering if i should do another coat of primer and sanding and doing prime-check or go straight to 2 layers of paint after prime check?

It seems all uniform, but some areas the mud is tad more visible due to primer soaking into drywall faster. ( the tone is visibly different, but only in few areas )
Would it be good idea to put a 2nd coat of primer only in these areas or go for whole basement?

Using Zinsser 1-2-3 primer if that changes anything
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
While PVA primers are ok for bare drywall they are the bottom of the barrel when it comes to primer.
Yeah, exactly why i used Zinnser bullseye 1-2-3, based on hundreds of reviews and recommendations from expert painters, that seemed to be most recommended painters, although one of the most priciest (4x price of kilz pva)
 

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Can a professional painter please correct/comment. Noticed over the years that if I one coat over new drywall and is seals the DW...the gray left behind can bleed through two coats of paint. Sometimes needs 3. If I primer with 2 coats, the wall looks white and the color takes "truer" if that's a word in this context. Now I have heard that a gray primer will give a bold color a truer tone? Not sure. BM or SW paint used only...thx
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks everyone! Now off to research best paint i can get in my area ( Ontario, Canada ) or hop over to Detroit to grab some paint
 

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Chaz
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If 1 coat of primer and 2 coats of finish doesn't completely cover the wall either the paint is too cheap to use or it was applied way too thin.
What he said. Primer is used to seal the surface so you get even penetration of the top coats. Uneven penetration will, among other things, change the sheen of the top coats. You have already noticed that difference in the primer as it dried--but now it is sealed. It may or may not contribute to coverage, but that is not it's primary purpose. That is what PAINT is for. Regardless of the hype, there are no "one coat" finish paints. I painted professionally and--except for very unusual circumstance--I have never needed more than Prime + 2 coats.

Two important rules. 1) Do not use cheap paint!! Buy the best you can afford. 1) Do not spread paints or primers too thin! Put it on at the recommended thickness. That's usually thicker than most people apply, especially when using a roller.
 
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While PVA primers are ok for bare drywall they are the bottom of the barrel when it comes to primer.
Yes, PVA primers, like many paint products, are nothing magical. PVA primers are 'wall sizing' with varying degrees of pigment, if any. Not sure why they are even called 'primers'. Perhaps the public loves the word? ...... They are a 'sealer' (resin, water, and 'some' pigment .... usually just calcium). Purpose (I suppose) is to seal off the drywall so it doesn't suck the water out of the paint too fast and cause flashing. ......... I always wondered why use a primer and two coats of paint, when three coats of the paint itself will do the same. ..... And who knows, you may get lucky and find that two coats of paint worked just fine. ........... Pardon my Sinicism, but I think the main purpose of PVA (poly-vinyl-acrylic) primers is to separate you from your money.

Another money saver too is IF you have some left over, good quality, paint that you have no use for, thin it down with say'20%' water and use that for a 'sealer' coat.
 

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Chaz
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PVA is somewhat cheaper than general purpose primer, and waaay cheaper than good paint. Still, it does a perfectly fine job of prepping drywall, bare wood, or masonry. It's all I use on drywall and I've never had it fail. If you define primer as a product that prepares a surface for better adhesion and better application of a finish coat then PVA IS a primer for the intended substate. I would NEVER use paint over unsealed/unprimed drywall!! And I'm not going to even argue the need for primers in general.

Professional painters don't rely on "getting lucky". They use what they KNOW will produce quality work at a reasonable cost. PVA + 2 coats of quality paint will cover drywall/plaster with no holidays, a nice, even sheen, excellent adhesion and durability, at the least cost for quality application. None of what you propose is know to work, nor will thinning "good quality paint" save you money over PVA!
 

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Chaz
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Yes, PVA primers, like many paint products, are nothing magical. PVA primers are 'wall sizing' with varying degrees of pigment, if any. Not sure why they are even called 'primers'. Perhaps the public loves the word? ...... They are a 'sealer' (resin, water, and 'some' pigment .... usually just calcium). Purpose (I suppose) is to seal off the drywall so it doesn't suck the water out of the paint too fast and cause flashing. ......... I always wondered why use a primer and two coats of paint, when three coats of the paint itself will do the same. ..... And who knows, you may get lucky and find that two coats of paint worked just fine. ........... Pardon my Sinicism, but I think the main purpose of PVA (poly-vinyl-acrylic) primers is to separate you from your money.

Another money saver too is IF you have some left over, good quality, paint that you have no use for, thin it down with say'20%' water and use that for a 'sealer' coat.
PVA is somewhat cheaper than general purpose primer, and waaay cheaper than good paint. Still, it does a perfectly fine job of prepping drywall, bare wood, or masonry. It's all I use on drywall and I've never had it fail. If you define primer as a product that prepares a surface for better adhesion and better application of a finish coat then PVA IS a primer for the intended substate. I would NEVER use paint over unsealed/unprimed drywall!! And I'm not going to even argue the need for primers in general.

Professional painters don't rely on "getting lucky". They use what they KNOW will produce quality work at a reasonable cost. PVA + 2 coats of quality paint will cover drywall/plaster with no holidays, a nice, even sheen, excellent adhesion and durability, at the least cost for quality application. None of what you propose is know to work, nor will thinning "good quality paint" save you money over PVA!
 

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PVA is somewhat cheaper than general purpose primer, and waaay cheaper than good paint. Still, it does a perfectly fine job of prepping drywall, bare wood, or masonry. It's all I use on drywall and I've never had it fail. If you define primer as a product that prepares a surface for better adhesion and better application of a finish coat then PVA IS a primer for the intended substate. I would NEVER use paint over unsealed/unprimed drywall!! And I'm not going to even argue the need for primers in general.

Professional painters don't rely on "getting lucky". They use what they KNOW will produce quality work at a reasonable cost. PVA + 2 coats of quality paint will cover drywall/plaster with no holidays, a nice, even sheen, excellent adhesion and durability, at the least cost for quality application. None of what you propose is know to work, nor will thinning "good quality paint" save you money over PVA!
No need to argue, we all have our opinions. Sold thousands of gallons over the years. 90% to 'contractors'. Have spent a fair amount of time in two factories, watching the whole process, and have picked the brains of a few lab chemists.

And sorry, but what I propose 'does' work. Not only from doing it, but also from knowing 'what is in the can'. .... My opinions are based on years of comparing formulas between companies, AND between products in the same company. ...... Much duplication and salesman hype in the industry. ....... Trust me, PVA primer is just vinyl - acrylic resin, water, and cheap pigment. ..... If you like it, fine. Is it necessary, IMO, no.
 

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Sure PVA will work, in the sense that it won't do any harm. If you apply a coat of PVA on bare drywall, then 2 coats of quality paint, you'll get a good finish. Then again, if you skip the PVA and apply two coats of quality paint, you'll also get a good finish.

Most of today's quality paints are designed to be self priming over bare drywall with 2 coats.

As mentioned above, if you can't get good color saturation with 2 coats of paint, then your paint is not good quality or you're putting it on wrong. Exceptions might be the so called "clear" (bright) reds and yellows.

If you truly want a drywall sealer, then use Gardz.

SW uses a color prime system where they specify a certain shade of gray as a color primer before the top coat, for best color match. I tried this once since I was putting on a red (and it wasn't even a particularly "clear" red either). I put on the specified color prime primer, and I still needed 3 coats of Duration for full color saturation. Probably the same as if I didn't put any color prime on at all. Try the system if you want. I'd rather simply add another coat of my finish paint, then waste time switching between rollers and pans for 2 different coatings.

Some people say primers save money, especially if you tint them. It's not necessarily true, depending on the area you have to cover. Sometimes the primer route is more expensive when you take into account waste.
 

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I do not believe in paint & primer in one unless it's timeless or revolution, mainly, self priming paint is a lie!
 

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Chaz
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I do not believe in paint & primer in one unless it's timeless or revolution, mainly, self priming paint is a lie!
Agreed. Discussing it with the handful of experts who want to push an idea that is rejected by the vast majority of hands-on, professional painters won't change them. I just hate to see bad info passed onto those who are trying to learn.
 
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