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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
New tiles (9mm porcelain tiles on walls) in bath were installed few months ago. Bathroom has never used so far. I noticed few days ago that the grout at few different places have cracks / gaps in it and I don't like this now. I am worried that water could go in and damage when we start using the shower, or maybe not.

(I think the camera might be too close maybe that's why these gaps look real bad. Looking from far away, my wife says she doesn't notice anything and I am worrying about small things. I always thought there should be no cracks/gaps like these or else we could slowly damage the walls/floor under. We do have backerboard on walls, I remember and floor back sealing was done nicely too, probably)

Is this something I should be worried about?
If yes, is it a DIY fix?
Or is it better to just ask the contractor (who did the job) to fix it?






Thanks
S
 

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I would get the contractor back in. Can't imagine he would want that out there with his name on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I would get the contractor back in. Can't imagine he would want that out there with his name on it.
He doesn't care abut his name :(, that I know for sure.
I have a good feeling he will not fix it, and say that's how it is done. What's the method to fix it, is it a DIY thing?
 

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Any real tile pro would have known this was the wrong way to do this.
Now all the grout needs to be removed before caulking it.
 

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Grout in corners is going to crack. Grout is not waterproof ... you need a waterproof membrane behind it, not just backerboard. Grout needs to be removed and replaced with appropriate caulk.
 

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Discussion Starter #8

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Discussion Starter #9
Any real tile pro would have known this was the wrong way to do this.
Now all the grout needs to be removed before caulking it.
I am in trouble now. The licensed contractor has been paid and the overall experience wasn't good either. Overpaid for this too IMO. Lesson learnt.

So, remove grout at all 90 degree corners, then just silicone tile caulk?

why would you hire a so called "pro", if he doesn't care about his name ?
I realized that later. Not hiring him anymore. Lesson learnt.
 

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In this picture it looks like there is no tile in two spots, only grout? Is that right?

634262
 

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Naildriver
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As the others have stated, anytime you change planes, there should be no grout in those lines. Sanded grout caulk of a matching color is the way to go to prevent cracks. Remove the grout and replace it with grout caulk and the world will be happy. Sad you had the bad experience.
 

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Remodel and New Build GC
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Just for discussion and opinion.....

I've always preferred silicon caulk where appearance was acceptable....like white caulk when grout was white..

I always considered silicone superior.

Now I will also admit where a color and texrure and sheen was important, I have gone to the grout matching caulks, and have never encountered an issue/problem.

What's your opinion.
 

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New tiles (9mm porcelain tiles on walls) in bath were installed few months ago. Bathroom has never used so far. I noticed few days ago that the grout at few different places have cracks / gaps in it and I don't like this now. I am worried that water could go in and damage when we start using the shower, or maybe not.

(I think the camera might be too close maybe that's why these gaps look real bad. Looking from far away, my wife says she doesn't notice anything and I am worrying about small things. I always thought there should be no cracks/gaps like these or else we could slowly damage the walls/floor under. We do have backerboard on walls, I remember and floor back sealing was done nicely too, probably)

Is this something I should be worried about?
If yes, is it a DIY fix?
Or is it better to just ask the contractor (who did the job) to fix it?






Thanks
S
You mentiond they put in backerboard, I hate to ask this becuse I think I know the answer.
Did they install a showerpan or make one?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Post that guy's name here so everyone knows not to hire him! That is some seriously uneven tile work.
I think it may not be very nice to share info of the contractor in public. I realized this much later and I am glad we don't have to deal with him for other work now.

As the others have stated, anytime you change planes, there should be no grout in those lines. Sanded grout caulk of a matching color is the way to go to prevent cracks. Remove the grout and replace it with grout caulk and the world will be happy. Sad you had the bad experience.
Just for discussion and opinion.....
I've always preferred silicon caulk where appearance was acceptable....like white caulk when grout was white..
I always considered silicone superior.
Now I will also admit where a color and texrure and sheen was important, I have gone to the grout matching caulks, and have never encountered an issue/problem.
What's your opinion.
Thanks @chandler48 @MTN REMODEL LLC , I might be ok with regular white silicon caulk if that can work. This bathroom has greyish tiles but has somewhat white grout. This is the problem (cracks) with both bathrooms where his people installed tiles. The second bathroom has white (base color) tiles and white silicon there will be a perfect match i think.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
You mentiond they put in backerboard, I hate to ask this becuse I think I know the answer.
Did they install a showerpan or make one?
They made one. You talking about the black tar stuff? I just googled and I think 100% it was hot mop method they did. It wasn't the pre-made white fiberglass pan.

It is if properly applied, and up to the point it starts to fail. Then it has to fully completely removed before new silicone can be applied, and it’s a b!tch to remove.
I thought caulking was easy to remove? You mean silicon is tough to remove, so use caulking instead?
( i have used a lot of caulking myself around, never used silicon myself.)
 

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Naildriver
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If you are sold on silicone, be sure to let the cracks dry out completely before you apply it. If you apply silicone over moisture, mold will grow behind it and it will be a mess in a year or so.
 

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Silicone will eventually fail, usually the thin edges start to peel. Where it is failing it pulls up sort of ok. Where it’s still stuck ... it stuck good. And you can apply silicone over silicone ... won’t stick.
 
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